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No. 8 Mine Turquoise Jewelry Set [136900]

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No. 8 Mine Turquoise Jewelry Set [136900]
Item Details
Description
Vintage Native American jewelry. Incredible set--Magnificent squash blossom necklace (36"), 12 squash blossoms and and very large naja with huge oval center stone; cuff with 3 large stones ( inside measures 5.25" with a 1" opening); earrings with 2 cabochons each (pierced, 2" long); ring with 3 stones, 2.5" , size 7. These are a fine examples of stunning very rare, natural #8 mine Spider Web turquoise, all natural shapes, shadow box settings. Pieces unsigned except bracelet marked "J". This museum quality set will be a valuable addition to your collection. This set was purchased in 1972 at an Indian jewelry show and judged competition at the Hilton Hotel in NYC. There was an accompanying blue ribbon award with this set but was retained by the artist who sold it to the consignor.Here is some additional information:There has been a comment that the mineral in the No *. Mine turquoise is not turquoise, but Chalcosiderite. This is quite possibly impossible to tell without an XRD test. Regardless, a discussion of turquoise, and that of the “No. 8” deposit is appropriate.The No. 8 mine is near Cortez, NV, and was also known as the Blue Star Mine. Discovered in the 1920s, it is now under control of the Cortez Gold Mine. According to Castor and Ferdock, In Minerals of Nevada (p444), the mine produced more than $1.4 million in turquoise. It was found concentrated along quartz veins in chert, shale and altered granitics. This depositional environment will produce three very different turquoise types. There were several other turquoise mines nearby as well, and much turquoise came from the Cortez mining operation over the years.Interestingly, Castor and Furdock clearly state chalcosiderite is a form of turquoise: “rare iron analog of turquoise”, only reported in a few locales in the USA (none reported at Cortez.)Many of us as ore deport geologists have worked on dozens of ore deposits with turquoise, and can easily say that most deposits vary widely.Further, most turquoise in the old days was found near the surface, in well oxidized rock. Today, turquoise is found in open pit copper mines and gold mines.Weathering and oxidation can affect ore deposits at varying depths. Ores, and turquoise can be greatly affected, changing the physical characteristics of different minerals. In short, what was found on the surface in the 1920s at one ore deposit can be far different from what is found deeper in later years.
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No. 8 Mine Turquoise Jewelry Set [136900]

Estimate $3,000 - $5,000
Aug 07, 2021
See Sold Price
Starting Price $1,500
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Holabird Western Americana Collections

Holabird Western Americana Collections

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3032: No. 8 Mine Turquoise Jewelry Set [136900]

Sold for $4,100
3 Bids
Est. $3,000 - $5,000Starting Price $1,500
Sizzling Summer Auction Day 3
Aug 07, 2021 11:00 AM EDT
Buyer's Premium 25%

Lot 3032 Details

Description
...
Vintage Native American jewelry. Incredible set--Magnificent squash blossom necklace (36"), 12 squash blossoms and and very large naja with huge oval center stone; cuff with 3 large stones ( inside measures 5.25" with a 1" opening); earrings with 2 cabochons each (pierced, 2" long); ring with 3 stones, 2.5" , size 7. These are a fine examples of stunning very rare, natural #8 mine Spider Web turquoise, all natural shapes, shadow box settings. Pieces unsigned except bracelet marked "J". This museum quality set will be a valuable addition to your collection. This set was purchased in 1972 at an Indian jewelry show and judged competition at the Hilton Hotel in NYC. There was an accompanying blue ribbon award with this set but was retained by the artist who sold it to the consignor.Here is some additional information:There has been a comment that the mineral in the No *. Mine turquoise is not turquoise, but Chalcosiderite. This is quite possibly impossible to tell without an XRD test. Regardless, a discussion of turquoise, and that of the “No. 8” deposit is appropriate.The No. 8 mine is near Cortez, NV, and was also known as the Blue Star Mine. Discovered in the 1920s, it is now under control of the Cortez Gold Mine. According to Castor and Ferdock, In Minerals of Nevada (p444), the mine produced more than $1.4 million in turquoise. It was found concentrated along quartz veins in chert, shale and altered granitics. This depositional environment will produce three very different turquoise types. There were several other turquoise mines nearby as well, and much turquoise came from the Cortez mining operation over the years.Interestingly, Castor and Furdock clearly state chalcosiderite is a form of turquoise: “rare iron analog of turquoise”, only reported in a few locales in the USA (none reported at Cortez.)Many of us as ore deport geologists have worked on dozens of ore deposits with turquoise, and can easily say that most deposits vary widely.Further, most turquoise in the old days was found near the surface, in well oxidized rock. Today, turquoise is found in open pit copper mines and gold mines.Weathering and oxidation can affect ore deposits at varying depths. Ores, and turquoise can be greatly affected, changing the physical characteristics of different minerals. In short, what was found on the surface in the 1920s at one ore deposit can be far different from what is found deeper in later years.

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