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Important Elbridge Gerry to Samuel Adams asking for his

item-108684188=1
Important Elbridge Gerry to Samuel Adams asking for his

Lot 0004 Details

Description

Signer of the Declaration of Independence from Massachusetts (1744–1814) who later served as vice president under James Madison. His name entered the language as a result of his support of politically advantageous redistricting, which became known as ‘gerrymandering.’ ALS, signed “E. Gerry,” one page, 7.25 x 9.5, Boston , 18th June, 1783. Gerry was convinced to rejoin the Confederation Congress in 1783, when the state legislature agreed to support his call for needed reforms. He served in that body until September 1785, during which time it met in New York City. This is the very letter he sent to Samuel Adams The president of the Senate, asking for his seat back in Congress!

Letter in Full: Gentlemen having received from my honorable colleagues a copy of their remonstrance against the conduct of Congress, for a breach of Privilege, in February 1780 as stated in sundry letter, which I have since had the honor of addressing to the legislatures of the Commonwealth : and being fully satisfied with the Mode adopted, for preventing in future such unconstitutional proceedings: I propose by the earliest opportunity to resume my seat in Congress. If the Honorable legislature have any special command, shall my best and  to fulfill them; being gentleman with the highest respect your most obedient ser(vant) E. Gerry

The Honorable Samuel Adams Esq.  President  of the Senate and the Honorable Tristan Dalton Esq. speaker of the house

In 1780 he resigned from the Continental Congress over the issue, and refused offers from the state legislature to return to the Congress. He also refused appointment to the state senate, claiming he would be more effective in the state's lower chamber, and als refused appointment as a county judge, comparing the offer by Governor John Hancock to those made by royally-appointed governors to benefit their political allies

Gerry was convinced to rejoin the Confederation Congress in 1783, when the state legislature agreed to support his call for needed reforms. He served in that body until September 1785.

Gerry played a major role in the Constitutional Convention, held in Philadelphia during the summer of 1787. In its deliberations, he consistently advocated for a strong delineation between state and federal government powers, with state legislatures shaping the membership of federal government positions. Gerry's opposition to popular election of representatives was rooted in part by the events of Shays' Rebellion, a populist uprising in western Massachusetts in the year preceding the convention. Despite that position, he also sought to maintain individual liberties by providing checks on government power that might abuse or limit those freedoms.

He supported the idea that the Senate composition should not be determined by population; the view that it should instead be composed of equal numbers of members for each state prevailed in the Connecticut Compromise. The compromise was adopted on a narrow vote in which the Massachusetts delegation was divided, Gerry and Caleb Strong voting in favor. Gerry further proposed that senators of a state, rather than casting a single vote on behalf of the state, vote instead as individuals.[30] Gerry was also vocal in opposing the Three-Fifths Compromise, which counted slaves as three-fifths of a free person for the purposes of apportionment in the House of Representatives, which gave southern states a decided advantage. Gerry opposed slavery, and said the constitution should have "nothing to do" with slavery so as "not to sanction it." Gerry would ultimately not sign the final draft of the constitution because it allowed for slavery.

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Important Elbridge Gerry to Samuel Adams asking for his

Estimate $2,000 - $3,000
Aug 12
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Starting Price $200
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Ships fromCoral Gables, FL, United States
One of A Kind Collectibles LLC.

One of A Kind Collectibles LLC.

Coral Gables, FL, USA
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0004: Important Elbridge Gerry to Samuel Adams asking for his

Est. $2,000 - $3,000Starting Price $200
Rare Autographs, Manuscripts and Sports
Thu, Aug 12, 2021 8:00 PM EDT
Buyer's Premium 20%

Lot 0004 Details

Description
...

Signer of the Declaration of Independence from Massachusetts (1744–1814) who later served as vice president under James Madison. His name entered the language as a result of his support of politically advantageous redistricting, which became known as ‘gerrymandering.’ ALS, signed “E. Gerry,” one page, 7.25 x 9.5, Boston , 18th June, 1783. Gerry was convinced to rejoin the Confederation Congress in 1783, when the state legislature agreed to support his call for needed reforms. He served in that body until September 1785, during which time it met in New York City. This is the very letter he sent to Samuel Adams The president of the Senate, asking for his seat back in Congress!

Letter in Full: Gentlemen having received from my honorable colleagues a copy of their remonstrance against the conduct of Congress, for a breach of Privilege, in February 1780 as stated in sundry letter, which I have since had the honor of addressing to the legislatures of the Commonwealth : and being fully satisfied with the Mode adopted, for preventing in future such unconstitutional proceedings: I propose by the earliest opportunity to resume my seat in Congress. If the Honorable legislature have any special command, shall my best and  to fulfill them; being gentleman with the highest respect your most obedient ser(vant) E. Gerry

The Honorable Samuel Adams Esq.  President  of the Senate and the Honorable Tristan Dalton Esq. speaker of the house

In 1780 he resigned from the Continental Congress over the issue, and refused offers from the state legislature to return to the Congress. He also refused appointment to the state senate, claiming he would be more effective in the state's lower chamber, and als refused appointment as a county judge, comparing the offer by Governor John Hancock to those made by royally-appointed governors to benefit their political allies

Gerry was convinced to rejoin the Confederation Congress in 1783, when the state legislature agreed to support his call for needed reforms. He served in that body until September 1785.

Gerry played a major role in the Constitutional Convention, held in Philadelphia during the summer of 1787. In its deliberations, he consistently advocated for a strong delineation between state and federal government powers, with state legislatures shaping the membership of federal government positions. Gerry's opposition to popular election of representatives was rooted in part by the events of Shays' Rebellion, a populist uprising in western Massachusetts in the year preceding the convention. Despite that position, he also sought to maintain individual liberties by providing checks on government power that might abuse or limit those freedoms.

He supported the idea that the Senate composition should not be determined by population; the view that it should instead be composed of equal numbers of members for each state prevailed in the Connecticut Compromise. The compromise was adopted on a narrow vote in which the Massachusetts delegation was divided, Gerry and Caleb Strong voting in favor. Gerry further proposed that senators of a state, rather than casting a single vote on behalf of the state, vote instead as individuals.[30] Gerry was also vocal in opposing the Three-Fifths Compromise, which counted slaves as three-fifths of a free person for the purposes of apportionment in the House of Representatives, which gave southern states a decided advantage. Gerry opposed slavery, and said the constitution should have "nothing to do" with slavery so as "not to sanction it." Gerry would ultimately not sign the final draft of the constitution because it allowed for slavery.

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