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Henry Clay ALS with Outstanding Political Content:

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Henry Clay ALS with Outstanding Political Content:
Item Details
Description
Henry Clay ALS with Outstanding Political Content: "Unless we are greatly disappointed in the issue of Western Elections, Genl. Jackson's defeat is inevitable"

A 1p autograph letter signed by Kentucky statesman Henry Clay (1777-1852) as "H. Clay" at lower right. Written at Ashland, Clay's plantation outside Lexington, Kentucky, on September 10, 1832 on a single leaf of paper laid down on a piece of recycled stock. Expected paper folds, some brittle, with splitting and minor loss affecting a handful of words. Uneven toning and isolated stains, else good. The stock is slightly larger than the letter fragment and measures 8" x 7.25." Accompanied by a portrait of Clay after the original painting by John B. Neagle. Minor loss to the backing verso and trimmed. Also comes with a Letter of Authenticity from PSA/DNA Authentication Services, certification number W08965, dated February 23, 2015 as well as a copy of a Letter of Authenticity from Sig Auctions (Phoenix, Arizona.)

Clay, then a U.S. Senator from Kentucky, wrote a correspondent named Charles H. List about the upcoming 1832 presidential election in which he was a major party candidate. In December 1831, members of the National Republican Party National Convention had nominated Clay as their official candidate. Clay would face off against sitting President Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), the darling of the Democratic Party. Information filtering through Clay's network of national correspondents increased his confidence just two months prior to the presidential election. Clay wrongly anticipated a rout for the incumbent Andrew Jackson.

"Dear Sir

I recd. your letter of the 9th. Ulto. communicating the result of the recent Elections in your neighborhood, and other valuable information for which I offer you my thanks. Fuller information from your whole state would seem to shew [sic] that the general result was not quite as favorable as in your immediate vicinity. It was far, however, from being discouraging, and demonstrates that with exertion, demanded by the present crisis, your State will be adverse to the present administration.

The general prospects of the Election, judging from information that reaches me, are cheering. Unless we are greatly disappointed in the issue of Western Elections, Genl. Jackson's defeat is [inevit]able. In this State our friends believe that success in November is more certain than if they had carried the Governor's Election by a lean majority. Their loss of their Governor will operate as a Stimulus to higher efforts.

With great respect
I am Your ob. Servt.

H. Clay

Charles H. List Esq."

Andrew Jackson defeated Henry Clay, along with two other Nullifier and Anti-Masonic Party candidates, in the 1832 presidential election held over a one-month-long period between November 2-December 5, 1832. Jackson secured 219 Electoral College votes to Clay's 49, and over 54% of the popular vote to Clay's 37%.

An interesting aside is Clay's allusion to John Breathitt (1786-1834), the first elected Democratic Governor of Clay's home state of Kentucky. Breathitt won the gubernatorial race in 1832 despite allegations of voter fraud and served two years, between 1832-1834. Clay's observation that local and state election results inform national races is as true today as it was in 1832.

Excerpts from this letter were included in Editor Robert Seager II's "The Papers of Henry Clay, Vol. 8 'Candidate, Compromiser, Whig,' March 5, 1829 - December 31, 1836" (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1984) on page 574.

Henry Clay served as U.S. Secretary of State between 1825-1829. He was a 3x unsuccessful presidential candidate.

This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.

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Henry Clay ALS with Outstanding Political Content:

Estimate $200 - $300
Aug 25, 2021
See Sold Price
Starting Price $70
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0003: Henry Clay ALS with Outstanding Political Content:

Sold for $900
17 Bids
Est. $200 - $300Starting Price $70
Rare Autographs, Manuscripts & Books
Aug 25, 2021 10:30 AM EDT
Buyer's Premium 25%

Lot 0003 Details

Description
...
Henry Clay ALS with Outstanding Political Content: "Unless we are greatly disappointed in the issue of Western Elections, Genl. Jackson's defeat is inevitable"

A 1p autograph letter signed by Kentucky statesman Henry Clay (1777-1852) as "H. Clay" at lower right. Written at Ashland, Clay's plantation outside Lexington, Kentucky, on September 10, 1832 on a single leaf of paper laid down on a piece of recycled stock. Expected paper folds, some brittle, with splitting and minor loss affecting a handful of words. Uneven toning and isolated stains, else good. The stock is slightly larger than the letter fragment and measures 8" x 7.25." Accompanied by a portrait of Clay after the original painting by John B. Neagle. Minor loss to the backing verso and trimmed. Also comes with a Letter of Authenticity from PSA/DNA Authentication Services, certification number W08965, dated February 23, 2015 as well as a copy of a Letter of Authenticity from Sig Auctions (Phoenix, Arizona.)

Clay, then a U.S. Senator from Kentucky, wrote a correspondent named Charles H. List about the upcoming 1832 presidential election in which he was a major party candidate. In December 1831, members of the National Republican Party National Convention had nominated Clay as their official candidate. Clay would face off against sitting President Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), the darling of the Democratic Party. Information filtering through Clay's network of national correspondents increased his confidence just two months prior to the presidential election. Clay wrongly anticipated a rout for the incumbent Andrew Jackson.

"Dear Sir

I recd. your letter of the 9th. Ulto. communicating the result of the recent Elections in your neighborhood, and other valuable information for which I offer you my thanks. Fuller information from your whole state would seem to shew [sic] that the general result was not quite as favorable as in your immediate vicinity. It was far, however, from being discouraging, and demonstrates that with exertion, demanded by the present crisis, your State will be adverse to the present administration.

The general prospects of the Election, judging from information that reaches me, are cheering. Unless we are greatly disappointed in the issue of Western Elections, Genl. Jackson's defeat is [inevit]able. In this State our friends believe that success in November is more certain than if they had carried the Governor's Election by a lean majority. Their loss of their Governor will operate as a Stimulus to higher efforts.

With great respect
I am Your ob. Servt.

H. Clay

Charles H. List Esq."

Andrew Jackson defeated Henry Clay, along with two other Nullifier and Anti-Masonic Party candidates, in the 1832 presidential election held over a one-month-long period between November 2-December 5, 1832. Jackson secured 219 Electoral College votes to Clay's 49, and over 54% of the popular vote to Clay's 37%.

An interesting aside is Clay's allusion to John Breathitt (1786-1834), the first elected Democratic Governor of Clay's home state of Kentucky. Breathitt won the gubernatorial race in 1832 despite allegations of voter fraud and served two years, between 1832-1834. Clay's observation that local and state election results inform national races is as true today as it was in 1832.

Excerpts from this letter were included in Editor Robert Seager II's "The Papers of Henry Clay, Vol. 8 'Candidate, Compromiser, Whig,' March 5, 1829 - December 31, 1836" (Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1984) on page 574.

Henry Clay served as U.S. Secretary of State between 1825-1829. He was a 3x unsuccessful presidential candidate.

This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.

WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!

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