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George Wythe, Williamsburg Mayor & Law Professor, Signed Injunction

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George Wythe, Williamsburg Mayor & Law Professor, Signed Injunction
Item Details
Description

George Wythe, Williamsburg Mayor & Law Professor, Signed Injunction

1p, measuring 7" x 3" (sight), No place, dated March 6, 1798. A short handwritten document signed "G. Wythe", reading in full: "The injunction is awarded, on a release of errors, and security given in the penalty of seventy dollars." The document is matted and framed with an engraving of Wythe, a photograph of his Williamsburg residence, and two information plaques to the overall size of 18.75" x 15". Light toning throughout, with a few spots of soiling. Clear and attractive signature.

George Wythe (1726-1806) was the Mayor of Williamsburg, a member of the Continental Congress, and America's first law professor. In 1775, Wythe was elected to attend the Continental Congress and served for two years, voting in favor of the Declaration of Independence. In 1776, he returned to Virginia in order to form the new government and was elected Speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates in 1777. Wythe served as a judge for much of his life, and was also a prominent law professor at the College of William & Mary. There he met Thomas Jefferson, and the two men remained close throughout their lives. Wythe even left Jefferson his substantial book collection in his will.

Wythe was revered as a man of great honor and integrity, and in his old age grew increasingly uneasy about the issue of slavery. He became a quiet abolitionist, freeing his slaves and making provisions for them until they could earn a living on their own. Tragically, this moral act would cost Wythe his own life, when Wythe's grand-nephew learned that Wythe had conditionally willed part of the family property to his slaves. The 17-year-old George Wythe Sweeney had already stolen from Wythe to pay off gambling debts, and decided to enlarge his own share by way of murder. He poisoned Wythe and two of the slaves with arsenic. Wythe died two weeks later, but not before having his will amended to disinherit Sweeney. His grand-nephew was arrested and tried for the crime but was eventually acquitted, upon which he all but disappeared from historical record.

This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.

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George Wythe, Williamsburg Mayor & Law Professor, Signed Injunction

Estimate $3,000 - $4,000
Mar 30, 2022
See Sold Price
Starting Price $1,000
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Ships from Wilton, CT, United States
Local Pick-Up Wilton, CT, United States
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0024: George Wythe, Williamsburg Mayor & Law Professor, Signed Injunction

Sold for $2,600
5 Bids
Est. $3,000 - $4,000Starting Price $1,000
Rare Autographs, Manuscripts, Photos & Books
Mar 30, 2022 10:30 AM EDT
Buyer's Premium 25%

Lot 0024 Details

Description
...

George Wythe, Williamsburg Mayor & Law Professor, Signed Injunction

1p, measuring 7" x 3" (sight), No place, dated March 6, 1798. A short handwritten document signed "G. Wythe", reading in full: "The injunction is awarded, on a release of errors, and security given in the penalty of seventy dollars." The document is matted and framed with an engraving of Wythe, a photograph of his Williamsburg residence, and two information plaques to the overall size of 18.75" x 15". Light toning throughout, with a few spots of soiling. Clear and attractive signature.

George Wythe (1726-1806) was the Mayor of Williamsburg, a member of the Continental Congress, and America's first law professor. In 1775, Wythe was elected to attend the Continental Congress and served for two years, voting in favor of the Declaration of Independence. In 1776, he returned to Virginia in order to form the new government and was elected Speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates in 1777. Wythe served as a judge for much of his life, and was also a prominent law professor at the College of William & Mary. There he met Thomas Jefferson, and the two men remained close throughout their lives. Wythe even left Jefferson his substantial book collection in his will.

Wythe was revered as a man of great honor and integrity, and in his old age grew increasingly uneasy about the issue of slavery. He became a quiet abolitionist, freeing his slaves and making provisions for them until they could earn a living on their own. Tragically, this moral act would cost Wythe his own life, when Wythe's grand-nephew learned that Wythe had conditionally willed part of the family property to his slaves. The 17-year-old George Wythe Sweeney had already stolen from Wythe to pay off gambling debts, and decided to enlarge his own share by way of murder. He poisoned Wythe and two of the slaves with arsenic. Wythe died two weeks later, but not before having his will amended to disinherit Sweeney. His grand-nephew was arrested and tried for the crime but was eventually acquitted, upon which he all but disappeared from historical record.

This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.

WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!  

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