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Aquatint by Manuel Robbe, Marche a Montmartre, c1901

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Aquatint by Manuel Robbe, Marche a Montmartre, c1901
Item Details
Description
Aquatint by Manuel Robbe, Marche a Montmartre, c1901

Frame: 29" x 26.5"
Aquatint: 15.5" x 12 3/4"

Manuel Robbe
(Source: contessagallery.com) Manuel Robbe (1872-1936) was a brilliant printmaker who masted the aquatint technique. He was born in Paris, shortly after the Franco-Prussian War. He soon began studies at the Lycees Condorcet with Louis Legrand. In the early 1890s Robbe enrolled at the Academie Julian and later, at the prestigious Ecole des Beaux- Arts. Here, he learned the intricacies of etching and aquatint from master etcher Eugene Delatre. He exhibited regularly at the Salons of Societe des Artistes Francais and in 1900, he received a bronze medal at the Worlds Fair for his contribution to printmaking.

In the beginning of his career, Robbe began to incorporate many innovative etching techniques into his artwork, such as, the sugar-lift, aquatint and a la poupee. His technique was developed over several phases. He painted his design with a mixture of sugar, India ink and gum arabic on a zinc plate. The plate was then covered entirely with a varnish. By immersing the plate in water, the sugar would melt, leaving a thin white line. Resin was added and the plate was heated from the bottom. The plate was placed into an acid bath, to bite the lines and establish line intensity. Finally, Robbe painted the plate with an oil brush made of rags called a la poupee. Robbe would arrive with new shades of color with each impression, because he would have to paint the plate each time an impression was pulled. He always succeeded in giving his aquatints great intensity, unique color diversity and extraordinary painterly effects.

Robbe was influenced by the most of the important nineteenth century artists such as Degas, Renoir, Legrand, Chahine and Lautrec. Robbe delighted in depicting women. He was known to show the individuality of his female subjects, while celebrating their beauty. His prints chronicled the emerging status of women as decision-makers and connoisseurs, as well as having the ability to judge and appreciate art. He also was able to show their sensuality, sociability, and the ability of the modern women to elegantly enjoy the simple pleasures in life.
Condition
Good condition overall
Buyer's Premium
  • 25%

Aquatint by Manuel Robbe, Marche a Montmartre, c1901

Estimate $200 - $300
Jul 10, 2022
See Sold Price
Starting Price $100
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0116: Aquatint by Manuel Robbe, Marche a Montmartre, c1901

Sold for $200
5 Bids
Est. $200 - $300Starting Price $100
July 10. Cool Summer Bargains
Jul 10, 2022 10:00 AM EDT
Buyer's Premium 25%

Lot 0116 Details

Description
...
Aquatint by Manuel Robbe, Marche a Montmartre, c1901

Frame: 29" x 26.5"
Aquatint: 15.5" x 12 3/4"

Manuel Robbe
(Source: contessagallery.com) Manuel Robbe (1872-1936) was a brilliant printmaker who masted the aquatint technique. He was born in Paris, shortly after the Franco-Prussian War. He soon began studies at the Lycees Condorcet with Louis Legrand. In the early 1890s Robbe enrolled at the Academie Julian and later, at the prestigious Ecole des Beaux- Arts. Here, he learned the intricacies of etching and aquatint from master etcher Eugene Delatre. He exhibited regularly at the Salons of Societe des Artistes Francais and in 1900, he received a bronze medal at the Worlds Fair for his contribution to printmaking.

In the beginning of his career, Robbe began to incorporate many innovative etching techniques into his artwork, such as, the sugar-lift, aquatint and a la poupee. His technique was developed over several phases. He painted his design with a mixture of sugar, India ink and gum arabic on a zinc plate. The plate was then covered entirely with a varnish. By immersing the plate in water, the sugar would melt, leaving a thin white line. Resin was added and the plate was heated from the bottom. The plate was placed into an acid bath, to bite the lines and establish line intensity. Finally, Robbe painted the plate with an oil brush made of rags called a la poupee. Robbe would arrive with new shades of color with each impression, because he would have to paint the plate each time an impression was pulled. He always succeeded in giving his aquatints great intensity, unique color diversity and extraordinary painterly effects.

Robbe was influenced by the most of the important nineteenth century artists such as Degas, Renoir, Legrand, Chahine and Lautrec. Robbe delighted in depicting women. He was known to show the individuality of his female subjects, while celebrating their beauty. His prints chronicled the emerging status of women as decision-makers and connoisseurs, as well as having the ability to judge and appreciate art. He also was able to show their sensuality, sociability, and the ability of the modern women to elegantly enjoy the simple pleasures in life.
Condition
...
Good condition overall

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