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F. Scott Fitzgerald Signed Letter to Journalist Miss

Lot 0073 Details

Description
Fitzgerald F. Scott




F.Scott Fitzgerald Signed Letter to Journalist Miss Marshall Re: "The Beautiful And The Damned"


 


Single page autographed letter signed, 8.5" x 10.5". Undated, however C. 1922, based on his hand written return address of "626 Goodrich Ave, St. Paul, Minn" (which home address was his location when he completed his second novel, The Beautiful and the Damned), and based on the recipient's name of "Miss Marshall". Signed by Fitzgerald with a large 3" signature as "F Scott Fitzgerald". Page is lightly toned with expected folds. Lovely vibrant ink, near fine. Presented matted with a fantastic portrait of Fitzgerald to a completed size of 19" x 15".


 


A phenomenal letter, undated but the recipient name and return address for Fitzgerald establishes the context. Published research has shown this letter was in response to Marguerite Mooers Marshall interview of Fitzgerald for the New York Evening World on April 1, 1922 just after his newly published second book, The Beautiful And The Damned, the story of the troubled marriage of Anthony and Gloria Patch. The Beautiful and the Damned helped to cement Fitzgerald’s status as one of the great chroniclers and satirists of the culture of wealth, extravagance and ambition that emerged during the affluent 1920s — what became known as the Jazz Age. "It was an age of miracles," Fitzgerald wrote, "it was an age of art, it was an age of excess, and it was an age of satire." Marshall's interview, dated April 1, 1922 is available in its entirety online, however below are some revealing excepts (and a copy of the entire interview will be included with this lot):


 


"New York is going crazy! When I was here a year ago I thought we'd seen the end of night life. But now it's going on as it never was before Prohibition. I'm confident that you can find anything here that you find in Paris. Everybody is drinking harder—that's sure. Possessing liquor is a proof of respectability, of social position. You can't go anywhere without having your host bring out his bottle and offer you a drink. He displays his liquor as he used to display his new car or his wife's jewels. Prohibition. it seems to me. is having simply a ruinous effect on young men".


 


It is a young man himself who is speaking—no clergyman. no social reformer, but a "regular" young man. Most of you know his name—F. Scott Fitzgerald. who wrote This Side of Paradise, a book that managed to be both brilliant and popular, when he was just out of Princeton, two years ago; whose second novel, The Beautiful and Damned is newly published. (A reader of both suggests that, in view of the first tale, the second could have been called, consistently, "Next Stop Is Hell!"


 


The frank Mr. Fitzgerald undoubtedly set the fashion of holding the mirror up to the flapper … Mr. Fitzgerald turns his attention to other representatives of his generation - to the "younger marrieds, " in the location of the society columns. They out-flap the flapper! With youth, health, love, friends, money, pleasure his Anthony and Gloria, typifying the prosperous, newly married couple in New York, are hopelessly, irretrievably "damned", broken in body and spirit …


 


Marshall asks Fitzgerald "What is the matter with your young married couples?"


 


Fitzgerald's personal insight into the state of society is transposed to the characters of his new novel, he continued  "There's the philosophy of ever so many young people to-day. They don't believe in the old standards and authorities" Marshall then poised the question to Fitzgerald of how far he considered the young married woman to blame for the "damnation" of her own life and that of her husband. His response held nothing back and echoed Fitzgerald's philosophies on of the ever changing societal issues, the changes in male-female relationships, and a recurring theme he presents throughout his novels:


 


"She's very largely to blame," he responded promptly. "Our American women are leeches. They're an utterly useless fourth generation trading on the accomplishment of their pioneer great-grandmothers. They simply dominate the American man. You should see the dowagers trailing around this hotel with their dependent males! No Englishman would endure one-eighth of what an American takes from his wife. "I've often asked myself the question, 'To what is a woman entitled from life?' The answer, obviously. is 'All she can get!' And when she marries she gets the whole thing. She makes a man love her, then proceeds to hog all his emotions, to get all the money out of him she can, to keep him at her beck and call. She makes a monkey of him, in many cases. and he has to stand it unless he wants a continuous verbal battle … "


 


A fantastic autographed letter, with the association to an important and highly revealing interview.




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F. Scott Fitzgerald Signed Letter to Journalist Miss

Estimate $5,000 - $6,000
Dec 05, 2018
Starting Price $1,600
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0073: F. Scott Fitzgerald Signed Letter to Journalist Miss

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Est. $5,000 - $6,000Starting Price $1,600
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Lot 0073 Details

Description
...
Fitzgerald F. Scott




F.Scott Fitzgerald Signed Letter to Journalist Miss Marshall Re: "The Beautiful And The Damned"


 


Single page autographed letter signed, 8.5" x 10.5". Undated, however C. 1922, based on his hand written return address of "626 Goodrich Ave, St. Paul, Minn" (which home address was his location when he completed his second novel, The Beautiful and the Damned), and based on the recipient's name of "Miss Marshall". Signed by Fitzgerald with a large 3" signature as "F Scott Fitzgerald". Page is lightly toned with expected folds. Lovely vibrant ink, near fine. Presented matted with a fantastic portrait of Fitzgerald to a completed size of 19" x 15".


 


A phenomenal letter, undated but the recipient name and return address for Fitzgerald establishes the context. Published research has shown this letter was in response to Marguerite Mooers Marshall interview of Fitzgerald for the New York Evening World on April 1, 1922 just after his newly published second book, The Beautiful And The Damned, the story of the troubled marriage of Anthony and Gloria Patch. The Beautiful and the Damned helped to cement Fitzgerald’s status as one of the great chroniclers and satirists of the culture of wealth, extravagance and ambition that emerged during the affluent 1920s — what became known as the Jazz Age. "It was an age of miracles," Fitzgerald wrote, "it was an age of art, it was an age of excess, and it was an age of satire." Marshall's interview, dated April 1, 1922 is available in its entirety online, however below are some revealing excepts (and a copy of the entire interview will be included with this lot):


 


"New York is going crazy! When I was here a year ago I thought we'd seen the end of night life. But now it's going on as it never was before Prohibition. I'm confident that you can find anything here that you find in Paris. Everybody is drinking harder—that's sure. Possessing liquor is a proof of respectability, of social position. You can't go anywhere without having your host bring out his bottle and offer you a drink. He displays his liquor as he used to display his new car or his wife's jewels. Prohibition. it seems to me. is having simply a ruinous effect on young men".


 


It is a young man himself who is speaking—no clergyman. no social reformer, but a "regular" young man. Most of you know his name—F. Scott Fitzgerald. who wrote This Side of Paradise, a book that managed to be both brilliant and popular, when he was just out of Princeton, two years ago; whose second novel, The Beautiful and Damned is newly published. (A reader of both suggests that, in view of the first tale, the second could have been called, consistently, "Next Stop Is Hell!"


 


The frank Mr. Fitzgerald undoubtedly set the fashion of holding the mirror up to the flapper … Mr. Fitzgerald turns his attention to other representatives of his generation - to the "younger marrieds, " in the location of the society columns. They out-flap the flapper! With youth, health, love, friends, money, pleasure his Anthony and Gloria, typifying the prosperous, newly married couple in New York, are hopelessly, irretrievably "damned", broken in body and spirit …


 


Marshall asks Fitzgerald "What is the matter with your young married couples?"


 


Fitzgerald's personal insight into the state of society is transposed to the characters of his new novel, he continued  "There's the philosophy of ever so many young people to-day. They don't believe in the old standards and authorities" Marshall then poised the question to Fitzgerald of how far he considered the young married woman to blame for the "damnation" of her own life and that of her husband. His response held nothing back and echoed Fitzgerald's philosophies on of the ever changing societal issues, the changes in male-female relationships, and a recurring theme he presents throughout his novels:


 


"She's very largely to blame," he responded promptly. "Our American women are leeches. They're an utterly useless fourth generation trading on the accomplishment of their pioneer great-grandmothers. They simply dominate the American man. You should see the dowagers trailing around this hotel with their dependent males! No Englishman would endure one-eighth of what an American takes from his wife. "I've often asked myself the question, 'To what is a woman entitled from life?' The answer, obviously. is 'All she can get!' And when she marries she gets the whole thing. She makes a man love her, then proceeds to hog all his emotions, to get all the money out of him she can, to keep him at her beck and call. She makes a monkey of him, in many cases. and he has to stand it unless he wants a continuous verbal battle … "


 


A fantastic autographed letter, with the association to an important and highly revealing interview.




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