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M.I.T. Professor Reflects on Manhattan Project to

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M.I.T. Professor Reflects on Manhattan Project to

Lot 0087 Details

Description
Groves Leslie M.I.T. Professor Reflects on Manhattan Project to Groves
  "It was a great compliment to me...to participate in the birth of a new dimension to man's control of his environment."
  Typed Letter Signed, to Leslie R. Groves Jr., February 8, 1957. 1 p., 8.5" x 11".  Very good.
  Excerpt
"Since I have heard that the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers is to give me the Richards Award...no expression of appreciation and congratulation has moved me so much as your own. Although I do not know the detail, I can appreciate the tremendous strain under which you worked for many years and the immense contribution that you made by your perseverance, by your selection of associates and in every other way during your management of the Manhattan Project. It was a great compliment to me and to many others to have had a chance to work with you and to participate in the birth of a new dimension to man's control of his environment."
 
  Antoine M. Gaudin (1900-1974) was born in Turkey and learned five languages before he became an adult. He attended universities in France and received bachelor's degrees in 1916 and 1917. His family moved to the United States where he attended Columbia University and received an Engineer of Mines degree from the School of Mines at Columbia in 1921. He taught at several universities in New York, Utah, and Montana, and became a prominent metallurgist. He became a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1939 and taught there until retiring in 1966. During World War II, he developed ore-processing techniques for extracting uranium from its low-grade ores for the Manhattan Project.
  Leslie R. Groves Jr. (1896-1970) was a United States Army General with the Corps of Engineers who oversaw the construction of the Pentagon and directed the Manhattan Project that developed the atomic bomb during World War II. Born in New York to a Protestant pastor who became an army chaplain, Groves graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1918 in a course shortened because of World War I. He entered the Corps of Engineers and gained promotions to major by 1940. In 1941, he was charged with overseeing the construction of the Pentagon, the largest office building in the world, with more than five million square feet. Disappointed that he had not received a combat assignment, Groves instead took charge of the Manhattan Project, designed to develop an atomic bomb. He continued nominally to supervise the Pentagon project to avoid suspicion, gained promotion to brigadier general, and began his work in September 1942. The project headquarters was initially in the War Department building in Washington, but in August 1943, moved to Oak Ridge, Tennessee. He and physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer selected the site in Los Alamos, New Mexico, for a laboratory, and Groves pushed successfully for Oppenheimer to be placed in charge. Groves was in charge of obtaining critical uranium ores internationally and collecting military intelligence on Axis atomic research. Promoted to major general in March 1944, Groves received the Distinguished Service Medal for his work on the Manhattan Project after the war. In 1947, Groves became chief of the Armed Forces Special Weapons Project. He received a promotion to lieutenant general in January 1948, just days before meeting with Army Chief of Staff Dwight D. Eisenhower, who reviewed a long list of complaints against Groves. Assured that he would not become Chief of Engineers, Groves retired in February 1948. From 1948 to 1961, he was a vice president of Sperry Rand, an equipment and electronics firm. After retirement, he served as president of the West Point alumni association and wrote a book on the Manhattan Project, published in 1962.
Ex. Leslie Groves Family, Christies Auction.

 
 

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M.I.T. Professor Reflects on Manhattan Project to

Estimate $300 - $400
Feb 27, 2019
Starting Price $100
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0087: M.I.T. Professor Reflects on Manhattan Project to

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Est. $300 - $400Starting Price $100
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Lot 0087 Details

Description
...
Groves Leslie M.I.T. Professor Reflects on Manhattan Project to Groves
  "It was a great compliment to me...to participate in the birth of a new dimension to man's control of his environment."
  Typed Letter Signed, to Leslie R. Groves Jr., February 8, 1957. 1 p., 8.5" x 11".  Very good.
  Excerpt
"Since I have heard that the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers is to give me the Richards Award...no expression of appreciation and congratulation has moved me so much as your own. Although I do not know the detail, I can appreciate the tremendous strain under which you worked for many years and the immense contribution that you made by your perseverance, by your selection of associates and in every other way during your management of the Manhattan Project. It was a great compliment to me and to many others to have had a chance to work with you and to participate in the birth of a new dimension to man's control of his environment."
 
  Antoine M. Gaudin (1900-1974) was born in Turkey and learned five languages before he became an adult. He attended universities in France and received bachelor's degrees in 1916 and 1917. His family moved to the United States where he attended Columbia University and received an Engineer of Mines degree from the School of Mines at Columbia in 1921. He taught at several universities in New York, Utah, and Montana, and became a prominent metallurgist. He became a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1939 and taught there until retiring in 1966. During World War II, he developed ore-processing techniques for extracting uranium from its low-grade ores for the Manhattan Project.
  Leslie R. Groves Jr. (1896-1970) was a United States Army General with the Corps of Engineers who oversaw the construction of the Pentagon and directed the Manhattan Project that developed the atomic bomb during World War II. Born in New York to a Protestant pastor who became an army chaplain, Groves graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1918 in a course shortened because of World War I. He entered the Corps of Engineers and gained promotions to major by 1940. In 1941, he was charged with overseeing the construction of the Pentagon, the largest office building in the world, with more than five million square feet. Disappointed that he had not received a combat assignment, Groves instead took charge of the Manhattan Project, designed to develop an atomic bomb. He continued nominally to supervise the Pentagon project to avoid suspicion, gained promotion to brigadier general, and began his work in September 1942. The project headquarters was initially in the War Department building in Washington, but in August 1943, moved to Oak Ridge, Tennessee. He and physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer selected the site in Los Alamos, New Mexico, for a laboratory, and Groves pushed successfully for Oppenheimer to be placed in charge. Groves was in charge of obtaining critical uranium ores internationally and collecting military intelligence on Axis atomic research. Promoted to major general in March 1944, Groves received the Distinguished Service Medal for his work on the Manhattan Project after the war. In 1947, Groves became chief of the Armed Forces Special Weapons Project. He received a promotion to lieutenant general in January 1948, just days before meeting with Army Chief of Staff Dwight D. Eisenhower, who reviewed a long list of complaints against Groves. Assured that he would not become Chief of Engineers, Groves retired in February 1948. From 1948 to 1961, he was a vice president of Sperry Rand, an equipment and electronics firm. After retirement, he served as president of the West Point alumni association and wrote a book on the Manhattan Project, published in 1962.
Ex. Leslie Groves Family, Christies Auction.

 
 

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