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Christopher Morley THE HAUNTED BOOKSHOP 1919 Signed
Item Details
Description

Christopher Morley THE HAUNTED BOOKSHOP 1919 Signed First Edition Third State Custom Leather-Trimmed Slipcase Roger Mifflin Book Seller Titania Chapman American Novelist Writer Essayist Journalist Poet Fiction

Title: The Haunted Bookshop
Author: Christopher Morley - Christopher Morley was an American journalist, novelist, essayist and poet. He also produced stage productions for a few years and gave college lectures.

Christopher Morley was born in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. His father, Frank Morley, was a mathematics professor at Haverford College; his mother, Lilian Janet Bird, was a violinist who provided Christopher with much of his later love for literature and poetry.
In 1900 the family moved to Baltimore, Maryland. In 1906 Christopher entered Haverford College, graduating in 1910 as valedictorian. He then went to New College, Oxford, for three years on a Rhodes scholarship, studying modern history.
In 1913 Morley completed his Oxford studies and moved to New York City, New York. On 14 June 1914, he married Helen Booth Fairchild, with whom he would have four children, including Louise Morley Cochrane. They first lived in Hempstead, and then in Queens Village. They then moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and in 1920 they made their final move, to a house they called "Green Escape" in Roslyn Estates, New York. They remained there for the rest of his life. In 1936 he built a cabin at the rear of the property (The Knothole), which he maintained as his writing study from then on.
In 1951 Morley suffered a series of strokes, which greatly reduced his voluminous literary output. He died on March 28, 1957, and was buried in the Roslyn Cemetery in Nassau County, New York. After his death, two New York newspapers published his last message to his friends:
"Read, every day, something no one else is reading. Think, every day, something no one else is thinking. Do, every day, something no one else would be silly enough to do. It is bad for the mind to continually be part of unanimity."

Morley began writing while still in college. He edited The Haverfordian and contributed articles to that college publication. He provided scripts for and acted in the college's drama program. He played on the cricket and soccer teams.
In Oxford a volume of his poems, "The Eighth Sin" (1912), was published. After graduating from Oxford, Morley began his literary career at Doubleday, working as publicist and publisher's reader. In 1917 he got his start as an editor for Ladies' Home Journal (1917–1918), then as a newspaper reporter and newspaper columnist in Philadelphia for the Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger.
Morley's first novel, "Parnassus on Wheels," appeared in 1917. The protagonist, traveling bookseller Roger Mifflin, appeared again in his second novel, "The Haunted Bookshop" in 1919.
In 1920 he returned to New York City to write a column (The Bowling Green) for the New York Evening Post.
He was one of the founders and a longtime contributing editor of the Saturday Review of Literature. A highly gregarious man, he was the mainstay of what he dubbed the "Three Hours for Lunch Club." Out of enthusiasm for the Sherlock Holmes stories, he helped to found the Baker Street Irregulars and wrote the introduction to the standard omnibus edition of The Complete Sherlock Holmes. He also wrote an introduction to the standard omnibus edition of The Complete Works of Shakespeare in 1936, although Morley called it an "Introduction to Yourself as a Reader of Shakespeare." That year, he was appointed to revise and enlarge "Bartlett's Familiar Quotations" (11th edition in 1937 and 12th edition in 1948). He was one of the first judges for the Book of the Month Club, serving in that position until the early 1950s.
Author of more than 100 novels, books of essays, and volumes of poetry, Morley is probably best known for his 1939 novel "Kitty Foyle," which was made into an Academy Award-winning movie. Another well-known work is "Thunder on the Left" (1925).
From 1928 to 1930, Morley co-produced theater productions (dramas) at his theaters in Hoboken, New Jersey, which he had "deemed the last seacoast in Bohemia."
For most of his life, he lived in Roslyn Estates, Nassau County, Long Island, commuting to the city on the Long Island Rail Road, about which he wrote affectionately. In 1961, a 98-acre (40-hectare) park was named in his honor on Searingtown Road in Nassau County. This park preserves as a publicly available point of interest his studio, the "Knothole" (which was moved to the site after his death), along with his furniture and bookcases.
Publisher: Doubleday, Page and Company
City: Garden City, New York
Year: 1919
Printing Information: First Edition
Binding Style: Hardcover
Pagination: 289 pages
Width: 5.25" Height: 7.75"
Book Details: This antique book is preserved in a brown chemise and handsome slipcase with gilt-lettered spine and raised bands. The antique book is bound in brown cloth with black lettering to the front cover and spine. This is a scarce third state, as given in Lee's bibliography, with page 76, "Burroughs" bruised, "76" in place, page 100, "Styx" correct. This book is signed by Christopher Morley on front flyleaf. Inscription there reads "Signed for / Norman H. Friedman / with best wishes / Christopher Morley."

The Haunted Bookshop is not a novel of the supernatural. Rather, the name refers to the ghosts of the past that haunt all libraries and bookstores: "the ghosts of all great literature." Throughout the novel Morley, through the character of Roger Mifflin, makes reference to the knowledge and wisdom that one can gain from literature. This is a suspenseful novel set in Brooklyn around the time of the end of World War I. It continues the story of Roger Mifflin, the book seller in Parnassus on Wheels. It also details an adventure of Miss Titania Chapman and a young advertising man named Aubrey Gilbert.
Condition / Notes: The book shows well with mild external wear; the binding is slightly shaken. Norman H. Friedman's bookplate appears on front pastedown. Pages are clean and without markings. The custom case displays staining to top panel and top edge of one side panel.

For lots which include only books, our shipping charge applies to any address within the fifty United States. For lots which are not books, the stated shipping cost in this listing will apply only to addresses within the continental 48 states. Within those parameters, the shipping cost for this lot will be: $4.50
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Christopher Morley THE HAUNTED BOOKSHOP 1919 Signed

Estimate $70 - $200
Jun 09, 2019
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Starting Price $10
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Ships from Freeville, NY, United States
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Jun 09, 2019 11:00 AM EDT|
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1093: Christopher Morley THE HAUNTED BOOKSHOP 1919 Signed

Sold for $325
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Est. $70 - $200Starting Price $10
Jun 09, 2019 11:00 AM EDT
Buyer's Premium 25%

Lot 1093 Details

Description
...

Christopher Morley THE HAUNTED BOOKSHOP 1919 Signed First Edition Third State Custom Leather-Trimmed Slipcase Roger Mifflin Book Seller Titania Chapman American Novelist Writer Essayist Journalist Poet Fiction

Title: The Haunted Bookshop
Author: Christopher Morley - Christopher Morley was an American journalist, novelist, essayist and poet. He also produced stage productions for a few years and gave college lectures.

Christopher Morley was born in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. His father, Frank Morley, was a mathematics professor at Haverford College; his mother, Lilian Janet Bird, was a violinist who provided Christopher with much of his later love for literature and poetry.
In 1900 the family moved to Baltimore, Maryland. In 1906 Christopher entered Haverford College, graduating in 1910 as valedictorian. He then went to New College, Oxford, for three years on a Rhodes scholarship, studying modern history.
In 1913 Morley completed his Oxford studies and moved to New York City, New York. On 14 June 1914, he married Helen Booth Fairchild, with whom he would have four children, including Louise Morley Cochrane. They first lived in Hempstead, and then in Queens Village. They then moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and in 1920 they made their final move, to a house they called "Green Escape" in Roslyn Estates, New York. They remained there for the rest of his life. In 1936 he built a cabin at the rear of the property (The Knothole), which he maintained as his writing study from then on.
In 1951 Morley suffered a series of strokes, which greatly reduced his voluminous literary output. He died on March 28, 1957, and was buried in the Roslyn Cemetery in Nassau County, New York. After his death, two New York newspapers published his last message to his friends:
"Read, every day, something no one else is reading. Think, every day, something no one else is thinking. Do, every day, something no one else would be silly enough to do. It is bad for the mind to continually be part of unanimity."

Morley began writing while still in college. He edited The Haverfordian and contributed articles to that college publication. He provided scripts for and acted in the college's drama program. He played on the cricket and soccer teams.
In Oxford a volume of his poems, "The Eighth Sin" (1912), was published. After graduating from Oxford, Morley began his literary career at Doubleday, working as publicist and publisher's reader. In 1917 he got his start as an editor for Ladies' Home Journal (1917–1918), then as a newspaper reporter and newspaper columnist in Philadelphia for the Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger.
Morley's first novel, "Parnassus on Wheels," appeared in 1917. The protagonist, traveling bookseller Roger Mifflin, appeared again in his second novel, "The Haunted Bookshop" in 1919.
In 1920 he returned to New York City to write a column (The Bowling Green) for the New York Evening Post.
He was one of the founders and a longtime contributing editor of the Saturday Review of Literature. A highly gregarious man, he was the mainstay of what he dubbed the "Three Hours for Lunch Club." Out of enthusiasm for the Sherlock Holmes stories, he helped to found the Baker Street Irregulars and wrote the introduction to the standard omnibus edition of The Complete Sherlock Holmes. He also wrote an introduction to the standard omnibus edition of The Complete Works of Shakespeare in 1936, although Morley called it an "Introduction to Yourself as a Reader of Shakespeare." That year, he was appointed to revise and enlarge "Bartlett's Familiar Quotations" (11th edition in 1937 and 12th edition in 1948). He was one of the first judges for the Book of the Month Club, serving in that position until the early 1950s.
Author of more than 100 novels, books of essays, and volumes of poetry, Morley is probably best known for his 1939 novel "Kitty Foyle," which was made into an Academy Award-winning movie. Another well-known work is "Thunder on the Left" (1925).
From 1928 to 1930, Morley co-produced theater productions (dramas) at his theaters in Hoboken, New Jersey, which he had "deemed the last seacoast in Bohemia."
For most of his life, he lived in Roslyn Estates, Nassau County, Long Island, commuting to the city on the Long Island Rail Road, about which he wrote affectionately. In 1961, a 98-acre (40-hectare) park was named in his honor on Searingtown Road in Nassau County. This park preserves as a publicly available point of interest his studio, the "Knothole" (which was moved to the site after his death), along with his furniture and bookcases.
Publisher: Doubleday, Page and Company
City: Garden City, New York
Year: 1919
Printing Information: First Edition
Binding Style: Hardcover
Pagination: 289 pages
Width: 5.25" Height: 7.75"
Book Details: This antique book is preserved in a brown chemise and handsome slipcase with gilt-lettered spine and raised bands. The antique book is bound in brown cloth with black lettering to the front cover and spine. This is a scarce third state, as given in Lee's bibliography, with page 76, "Burroughs" bruised, "76" in place, page 100, "Styx" correct. This book is signed by Christopher Morley on front flyleaf. Inscription there reads "Signed for / Norman H. Friedman / with best wishes / Christopher Morley."

The Haunted Bookshop is not a novel of the supernatural. Rather, the name refers to the ghosts of the past that haunt all libraries and bookstores: "the ghosts of all great literature." Throughout the novel Morley, through the character of Roger Mifflin, makes reference to the knowledge and wisdom that one can gain from literature. This is a suspenseful novel set in Brooklyn around the time of the end of World War I. It continues the story of Roger Mifflin, the book seller in Parnassus on Wheels. It also details an adventure of Miss Titania Chapman and a young advertising man named Aubrey Gilbert.
Condition / Notes: The book shows well with mild external wear; the binding is slightly shaken. Norman H. Friedman's bookplate appears on front pastedown. Pages are clean and without markings. The custom case displays staining to top panel and top edge of one side panel.

For lots which include only books, our shipping charge applies to any address within the fifty United States. For lots which are not books, the stated shipping cost in this listing will apply only to addresses within the continental 48 states. Within those parameters, the shipping cost for this lot will be: $4.50

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