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Caroline C. Fillmore, Rare Twice Signed Relic of

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Caroline C. Fillmore, Rare Twice Signed Relic of

Lot 0064 Details

Description
Description: Fillmore Caroline

Caroline C. Fillmore, Rare 1st Lady Scrapbook

A scrapbook 2x signed by Caroline C. Fillmore (1813-1881), second wife of 13th U.S. President Millard Fillmore (1800-1874). The first signature found on the front paste down endpaper reads "Caroline C. Fillmore / Buffalo. March. 1877." The second signature, as "Mrs Millard Fillmore", is located on the bottom of page 287. With possible additional inscriptions in Caroline's hand throughout.

The front soft cover emblazoned "The Art Journal" at top depicts a Classical vignette, while the back cover shows period product advertisements. An identification label, most likely from a historical society, is attached at the bottom of the spine. With expected light wear to covers and pages, else near fine. 9" x 11" x. 5". 100+ pages, most hand-paginated. Deaccessioned from the Buffalo and Erie County Historical Library, the institution founded by Millard and Abigail Fillmore.

Caroline C. Fillmore kept this scrapbook between 1862-1875. It is comprised of printed matter excised from New York City and Buffalo, New York newspapers. The articles, poems, songs, obituaries, and human interest stories that Caroline collected demonstrated the scope of her diverse interests. She was keenly interested in art, theater, music, literature, current events, politics, religion, manufacturing, sports, weather, and gossip [i.e. a New York World newspaper fold-out entitled "The Byron Secret", which revealed newly-surfaced details about Lord Byron's salacious marriage, seemed of especial interest to Caroline…]

Though her husband Millard Fillmore was not a Republican per se, Caroline's scrapbook reveals her personal Republican sympathies. The partly war dated scrapbook contains many references to the Civil War. Caroline's excerpts celebrated military commanders like George McClellan, Philip Sheridan, and James A. Rice, and also treated topics like veterans, black regiments, and cemetery dedication ceremonies. Other significant historical figures covered in the scrapbook include Abraham Lincoln, Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, Benjamin Franklin, and the Marquis de Lafayette.

Caroline married ex-President Millard Fillmore in 1858 in Albany; it was a second marriage for both. He had been out of the White House for five years, and had been widowed the same length of time (first wife Abigail Powers Fillmore had died just three weeks after Fillmore's presidential term ended.) Caroline had previously been married to an affluent Troy, New York businessman and railroad executive named Ezekiel C. McIntosh, who died in 1855. The newly married Fillmores signed a pre-nuptial agreement to protect Caroline's fortune and later settled in Buffalo, where they ranked among the city's leading socialites and philanthropists.

Literature was also important to Caroline's second husband. Millard Fillmore had been a lover of books since boyhood. By the time he reached adulthood, his library differed little from those found in families of wealth and education. Yet Fillmore was born into a poor family and became an indentured servant. His responsibilities, which ranged from farming, accounting, wood-cutting, and textile-making, prevented him from receiving a continuous education. So Fillmore educated himself. Motivated by a thirst for knowledge and a growing awareness of his comprehensive deficiencies, Fillmore read voraciously - using a dictionary to learn the meaning of words he didn't understand. Fillmore taught himself to read, and as he could not afford to buy books, sometimes he stole them.

Still obsessed with his education, he attended school in a nearby town, and his teacher, Abigail Powers, encouraged his studies. In time, she became the most influential and trusted person in his life. Abigail helped him learn with precision, and on subjects where they both lacked knowledge, they studied together. Fillmore realized when he later moved away that he had been "unconsciously stimulated by the companionship" of his teacher, but, too poor to visit Abigail Powers, they did not see each other for three years. In the interim, he apprenticed to a lawyer, began to teach professionally in the city of Buffalo, and was able to begin a law practice across the street from which he built a home to share with his new wife. When Millard Fillmore went to the state capital in Albany to serve a term in the state legislature, his wife stayed behind and began to purchase books of literature, poetry, and the classics to build upon his collection of law books at home, the core of what would become their personal library. Filmore and his first wife established a lending library and college in the city: the Buffalo and Erie County Historical Library.

This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.

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Caroline C. Fillmore, Rare Twice Signed Relic of

Estimate $600 - $700
Jun 26, 2019
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Ships fromWestport , CT, United States
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0064: Caroline C. Fillmore, Rare Twice Signed Relic of

Sold for $200
1 Bid
Est. $600 - $700Starting Price $200
Documents, Manuscripts, Photos & Books
Wed, Jun 26, 2019 10:30 AM EDT
Buyer's Premium 25%

Lot 0064 Details

Description
...
Description: Fillmore Caroline

Caroline C. Fillmore, Rare 1st Lady Scrapbook

A scrapbook 2x signed by Caroline C. Fillmore (1813-1881), second wife of 13th U.S. President Millard Fillmore (1800-1874). The first signature found on the front paste down endpaper reads "Caroline C. Fillmore / Buffalo. March. 1877." The second signature, as "Mrs Millard Fillmore", is located on the bottom of page 287. With possible additional inscriptions in Caroline's hand throughout.

The front soft cover emblazoned "The Art Journal" at top depicts a Classical vignette, while the back cover shows period product advertisements. An identification label, most likely from a historical society, is attached at the bottom of the spine. With expected light wear to covers and pages, else near fine. 9" x 11" x. 5". 100+ pages, most hand-paginated. Deaccessioned from the Buffalo and Erie County Historical Library, the institution founded by Millard and Abigail Fillmore.

Caroline C. Fillmore kept this scrapbook between 1862-1875. It is comprised of printed matter excised from New York City and Buffalo, New York newspapers. The articles, poems, songs, obituaries, and human interest stories that Caroline collected demonstrated the scope of her diverse interests. She was keenly interested in art, theater, music, literature, current events, politics, religion, manufacturing, sports, weather, and gossip [i.e. a New York World newspaper fold-out entitled "The Byron Secret", which revealed newly-surfaced details about Lord Byron's salacious marriage, seemed of especial interest to Caroline…]

Though her husband Millard Fillmore was not a Republican per se, Caroline's scrapbook reveals her personal Republican sympathies. The partly war dated scrapbook contains many references to the Civil War. Caroline's excerpts celebrated military commanders like George McClellan, Philip Sheridan, and James A. Rice, and also treated topics like veterans, black regiments, and cemetery dedication ceremonies. Other significant historical figures covered in the scrapbook include Abraham Lincoln, Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, Benjamin Franklin, and the Marquis de Lafayette.

Caroline married ex-President Millard Fillmore in 1858 in Albany; it was a second marriage for both. He had been out of the White House for five years, and had been widowed the same length of time (first wife Abigail Powers Fillmore had died just three weeks after Fillmore's presidential term ended.) Caroline had previously been married to an affluent Troy, New York businessman and railroad executive named Ezekiel C. McIntosh, who died in 1855. The newly married Fillmores signed a pre-nuptial agreement to protect Caroline's fortune and later settled in Buffalo, where they ranked among the city's leading socialites and philanthropists.

Literature was also important to Caroline's second husband. Millard Fillmore had been a lover of books since boyhood. By the time he reached adulthood, his library differed little from those found in families of wealth and education. Yet Fillmore was born into a poor family and became an indentured servant. His responsibilities, which ranged from farming, accounting, wood-cutting, and textile-making, prevented him from receiving a continuous education. So Fillmore educated himself. Motivated by a thirst for knowledge and a growing awareness of his comprehensive deficiencies, Fillmore read voraciously - using a dictionary to learn the meaning of words he didn't understand. Fillmore taught himself to read, and as he could not afford to buy books, sometimes he stole them.

Still obsessed with his education, he attended school in a nearby town, and his teacher, Abigail Powers, encouraged his studies. In time, she became the most influential and trusted person in his life. Abigail helped him learn with precision, and on subjects where they both lacked knowledge, they studied together. Fillmore realized when he later moved away that he had been "unconsciously stimulated by the companionship" of his teacher, but, too poor to visit Abigail Powers, they did not see each other for three years. In the interim, he apprenticed to a lawyer, began to teach professionally in the city of Buffalo, and was able to begin a law practice across the street from which he built a home to share with his new wife. When Millard Fillmore went to the state capital in Albany to serve a term in the state legislature, his wife stayed behind and began to purchase books of literature, poetry, and the classics to build upon his collection of law books at home, the core of what would become their personal library. Filmore and his first wife established a lending library and college in the city: the Buffalo and Erie County Historical Library.

This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.

WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!

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