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Edgar Degas ALS Stalling Art Patron, "Never, truly, can

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Edgar Degas ALS Stalling Art Patron, "Never, truly, can
Item Details
Description
Degas Edgar

Edgar Degas ALS Stalling Art Patron, "Never, truly, can I do anything fast"; & Mentioning Renoir, Fellow Impressionist


3pp autograph letter in French inscribed overall by Impressionist artist Edgar Degas (1834-1917), and signed by him as "degas" at the center of the second page. Written in Paris, France on "Monday", no date. On cream laid bifold paper. Expected paper folds, including some well-creased, and with minor closed tears and isolated loss at the intersections. Surface grime on the first page. The fourth page is blank. Else fair to good. 5.25" x 8".


Degas's letter is addressed to a certain "Deschamps", most likely Charles William Deschamps (1848-1908), Degas's art dealer and the manager of Durand-Ruel's London offices.


The letter mentions two significant players in the nineteenth-century art and art collecting world: Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919) and Jean-Baptiste Faure (1830-1914).


Degas had a 20-year-long professional relationship with Jean-Baptiste Faure, who was a French opera singer, art patron, and art collector. Faure commissioned work from Degas, and later owned Degas paintings depicting racehorses, ballerinas, and a woman ironing, among other subjects. Though Degas appreciated the income derived from Faure's commissions, the frenetic artist had a difficult time finishing them. In fact, Faure sued Degas for violating the terms of their contract and for non-delivery of paintings in the late 1880s. Our letter paints a similar picture: Degas wanted to avoid his obligations to Faure by abandoning the commissioned works altogether. Faure was quite possibly the worst person to alienate; the powerful and wealthy collector also patronized many of Degas's colleagues. [For more information, see the exhibition catalogue Degas, edited by curator Jean Sutherland Boggs (New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1988-1989), 222.]


In the postscript, Degas asks Deschamps about the work of his friend Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919), who was also a client of the art dealer Durand-Ruel. In addition to Degas and Renoir, Durand-Ruel sold the works of other Impressionist luminaries such as Manet, Monet, Sisley, and Pissarro.


Degas also mentions a "Rivey" in the letter, possibly referring to French painter Arsène-Hippolyte-Florent Rivey (1838-1903).


Translated in full:


"Paris - Monday


Ah! my dear Deschamps, I must have a black mark on me at your house! - Well, if you do not receive the object Wednesday you will see me myself with it with excuses -


I have had to disengage myself from Faure, at all costs, as I told you, and for the Large [one] only. There remains the rest, about which he is already angry. - Never, truly, can I do anything fast, and, I told him that I did it already, that the sword [was in] the ribs. - I would like you to be here all eight days, jostling me; all would go better.


And then we have had such bad weather, and the weather is complicated by fog, [illegible] so badly arranged! - My eyes are like sponges, absorbing the least bit of water. - That can hardly improve [things].


I blush to write you again. - When a good crate [comes along that] suits me, that you can hold it for me.


Your ashamedly devoted

degas


Talk to me of Renoir, who always asks for news about his paintings. - And Rivey? Have you received his painting? Why did he come to tell me that a friend traveling in London didn't see it at your house? The poor kid was sorry and humiliated - ".


A very intimate portrait of Edgar Degas, showing how the artist, when not capturing the essence of the race track, ballet studio, or washtub, procrastinated--to disastrous consequences!


This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.


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Edgar Degas ALS Stalling Art Patron, "Never, truly, can

Estimate $3,000 - $3,500
Nov 05, 2019
See Sold Price
Starting Price $1,000
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Ships from Westport, CT, United States
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0070: Edgar Degas ALS Stalling Art Patron, "Never, truly, can

Sold for $2,000
11 Bids
Est. $3,000 - $3,500Starting Price $1,000
Manuscripts, Books & Apollo Related Items
Nov 05, 2019 10:30 AM EST
Buyer's Premium 25%

Lot 0070 Details

Description
...
Degas Edgar

Edgar Degas ALS Stalling Art Patron, "Never, truly, can I do anything fast"; & Mentioning Renoir, Fellow Impressionist


3pp autograph letter in French inscribed overall by Impressionist artist Edgar Degas (1834-1917), and signed by him as "degas" at the center of the second page. Written in Paris, France on "Monday", no date. On cream laid bifold paper. Expected paper folds, including some well-creased, and with minor closed tears and isolated loss at the intersections. Surface grime on the first page. The fourth page is blank. Else fair to good. 5.25" x 8".


Degas's letter is addressed to a certain "Deschamps", most likely Charles William Deschamps (1848-1908), Degas's art dealer and the manager of Durand-Ruel's London offices.


The letter mentions two significant players in the nineteenth-century art and art collecting world: Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919) and Jean-Baptiste Faure (1830-1914).


Degas had a 20-year-long professional relationship with Jean-Baptiste Faure, who was a French opera singer, art patron, and art collector. Faure commissioned work from Degas, and later owned Degas paintings depicting racehorses, ballerinas, and a woman ironing, among other subjects. Though Degas appreciated the income derived from Faure's commissions, the frenetic artist had a difficult time finishing them. In fact, Faure sued Degas for violating the terms of their contract and for non-delivery of paintings in the late 1880s. Our letter paints a similar picture: Degas wanted to avoid his obligations to Faure by abandoning the commissioned works altogether. Faure was quite possibly the worst person to alienate; the powerful and wealthy collector also patronized many of Degas's colleagues. [For more information, see the exhibition catalogue Degas, edited by curator Jean Sutherland Boggs (New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1988-1989), 222.]


In the postscript, Degas asks Deschamps about the work of his friend Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919), who was also a client of the art dealer Durand-Ruel. In addition to Degas and Renoir, Durand-Ruel sold the works of other Impressionist luminaries such as Manet, Monet, Sisley, and Pissarro.


Degas also mentions a "Rivey" in the letter, possibly referring to French painter Arsène-Hippolyte-Florent Rivey (1838-1903).


Translated in full:


"Paris - Monday


Ah! my dear Deschamps, I must have a black mark on me at your house! - Well, if you do not receive the object Wednesday you will see me myself with it with excuses -


I have had to disengage myself from Faure, at all costs, as I told you, and for the Large [one] only. There remains the rest, about which he is already angry. - Never, truly, can I do anything fast, and, I told him that I did it already, that the sword [was in] the ribs. - I would like you to be here all eight days, jostling me; all would go better.


And then we have had such bad weather, and the weather is complicated by fog, [illegible] so badly arranged! - My eyes are like sponges, absorbing the least bit of water. - That can hardly improve [things].


I blush to write you again. - When a good crate [comes along that] suits me, that you can hold it for me.


Your ashamedly devoted

degas


Talk to me of Renoir, who always asks for news about his paintings. - And Rivey? Have you received his painting? Why did he come to tell me that a friend traveling in London didn't see it at your house? The poor kid was sorry and humiliated - ".


A very intimate portrait of Edgar Degas, showing how the artist, when not capturing the essence of the race track, ballet studio, or washtub, procrastinated--to disastrous consequences!


This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.


WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!

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