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Important Early 18th Century Frontiersman Morris

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Important Early 18th Century Frontiersman Morris
Item Details
Description
French and Indian War

Important Early 18th Century Frontiersman Morris Griffith Archive: 12 Items and 15 Pages, Dated 1721 - 1753

Morris (Maurice) Griffith (1686 - 1766). Collection of 12 documents signed by or related to Griffith. In fair to good condition with expected weakness at the folds, some holes and paper loss including words, partial splits, wear, toning and foxing, some with chipped edges and smoothed folds.

Background

In The Tales of the Walrus (Xlibris, 2013), Richard Sharkey writes that "George Washington … knew a man of Welsh background named Morris (also sometimes known as Maurice) Griffith who served as an Indian scout at sometime during the French and Indian War."

Griffith was an experienced frontiersmen in the New River and Holston River area of Augusta County in Virginia. A prominent figure among the settlers of the Welsh Tract in Pennsylvania, on August 12, 1755, Morris Griffith was captured in a raid on Vause’s fort and escaped.

On July 10, 1758, in a letter, Christopher Gist informed Major George Washington that Morris Griffith had safely returned after being confronted by a "Party of Indians & French … This Seems to be the foundation of the News we had Sometime past of a Number of white Men and Indians Makeing for Bedford County. I thought proper to give you this …" . In 1750, the Ohio Company had hired Gist to survey along the Ohio River from what is now Pittsburgh to Louisville. Travelling with Washington to the Ohio Country in 1754, Gist served as scout, messenger, and Indian agent."

Gist continued, "There were many such tales of a so-called Welsh tribe; one of interest was a Maurice Griffith who was taken prisoner by the Shawnee Indians in 1764. The Indians eventually befriended him and took him on a hunting expedition to seek the source of the Missouri. High in the mountains they came across 'three white men in Indian dress' with whom they travelled for several days until they arrived at a village where there were others of the same tribe, all having the same European complexion. A council of this white Indian tribe decided to put the strangers to death and Griffith decided it was time to speak. He addressed them in the Welsh language explaining that they had no hostile intentions but merely sought the source of the Missouri and that they would return to their own lands satisfied with their discoveries. The Chief of the Tribe greeted them in Welsh and they were thereafter treated as guests, staying with the nation some eight months. " --- from Professor Bernard Knight CBE, President of MIRA, Madoc International Research Association, a group that meets regularly in South Wales to discuss their common interest in the legend of Prince Madoc ap Owain Gwynedd's voyages into the Western Ocean around 1170 AD and his possible landing in North America.

The Collection

(1) Autograph Letter Signed "your ever loving Aunt Cat. Howell," 1 page, 8.25" x 12". Peny gally [Wales], September 12, 1721. To her nephew, Morris Griffith, who had just arrived from Wales to America. In part, "… she keeps her at school, and bought her a new bible, by which means she is taught to read, which exceeds the riches of men's labor … they made his friends and relations that came to his funeral most heartily welcome, & made the priest preach on their charges; your father has been very diligent in enquiring whither it lies in his power to disinherit you …"

(2) Manuscript Document Signed "Jno Taylor" as Surveyor General of Chester County, 1 page, 7.5" x 8". Willis Town [Chester County, Pennsylvania], July 8, 1729. Taylor certified the description of the land. In part, "Morris Griffith's Land Situate in Willis Town in the County of Chester which he purchased of Michael Jobson. Begins at a black Oak being a Corner of Owen Thomas's Land thence South East … Containing one Hundred and twenty five acres besides the Usual Allowance for roads and highways."

(3) Manuscript Document Signed "Richd Richardson" and by two witnesses, 1 page, 7.5" x 12", on verso of a related signed Manuscript Document Signed, a "bond of arbitration" relating to the deed "Richard Richardson to Moris Griffith," August 30, 1731.

(4) Manuscript Letter Signed "Thomas Williams" in Dutch and Welsh, 1 page, 12" x 14". [Wales], June 22, 1733. To Morris Grifis. With transcription and partial English translation. In part " … give to Thomas James the means to come over to you and to pay fir my passage which I would have as inheritance from you and in that case it is likely that you were angry at that time as I was too young to come over and if you were to promise the same sort of promise now as the pen is in my hand…"

(5) Manuscript Letter Signed "Evan Yarward," 1 page, 8" x 12". July 7, 1736. In part, "I have send you these few lines to acquaint you how my Condition is in having a tennant to your father who is at home with me upon Condition as long as he be left untroubled by those that he is Indebted unto …" Addressed on verso to "Morris Griffith in the / Township of Willestown / Chester County Pensilv / ania."

(6) Third Person Autograph Letter Signed "Lewis James" in Welsh, 1 page, 4.25" x 8". Circa 1750. Not translated; with Welsh typescript. Addressed on verso to "Moris / Griffiths / a Pensilfan / ia." Mentions insurance, a house, and land in Wales.

(7) Autograph Letter Signed "Geo. Ashbridge," 1 page, 7.25" x 6.75". November 15, 1750. To "friend Morris Griffith." In full, "I have made Inquirey Concerning the Land that John Thomas Lives on and find that he is about three years behind of Paying his Rent which is twenty five Bushels of wheat a year he has a Previledg of Buying off the Leas fir one hundred Pound; it now belongs to Samuel Smith of Philadelphia he Lives in water Street above Mulbery Street. I am thy friend."

(8) His Will. Manuscript DS "Morris Griffit[h]," 3 pages, 7.75" x 12.5", front & verso on two conjoined sheets. Willistown, Pennsylvania, February 17, 1751. Portion missing on signature page removed "h" of signature. Signed by three witnesses. Griffith grants his lands and fortunes to his wife, children and relations, some still residing in Carmarthenshire, Wales. He also bequeaths to Jane Messer, his indentured servant, "The sum of Ten Pounds Pennsylvania currency and One Bed & Bedding after the Decease of my Wife ..."

(9) Manuscript Letter Signed "Evan Edward" in Welsh, 1 page, 8.25" x 8.25". March 9, 1752. Mentioning Moris Griffith, Mary Griffith, William Griffith and Thomas Griffith. Not translated.

(10) Autograph Letter Signed "Thomas Grythdd and wife" in Welsh, 1 page, to brother Moris. With partial English translation. [Wales], February 4. In part, "These few lines … find you as I am at this time a professor of God From your dear brother Thomas Gryffyth. He and his wife and three sons are in health and full of love. You have heard that Thomas, your brother, was dead, according to an account we heard, but we are still living in health, mercifully …"

(11) Manuscript Letter Signed "John Ma…," 2 pages, 5.5" x 6.75", separate conjoined sheets. March 15, 1753. Addressed on verso to "Mr Morris Griffiths / East Town / Living in Chester County / In / Pensilvania." In part, "There is one Sarah Grifith married to David John a Tenant of Mine, who have Many Small Children and in no Circumstance of otherwise there a Common Labourer who have desired now to visit to you …"

(12) Manuscript Letter Signed "Mary Jones," 1 page, 7.75" x 12.5", with integral leaf addressed "To / Mr. Morris Griffith / at Willistown in / Chester County in / Pensilvania / with Care These." Haverfird West, March 20, 1753. In part, "having this severall opportunity … to Enquire after your welfare as tis to Long Since I hard from you, you was so kind formerly to Send me a pair of Gloves … the woman which is the Bearer was a Servant with my father the year my mother Dide … "

This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.

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Important Early 18th Century Frontiersman Morris

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0060: Important Early 18th Century Frontiersman Morris

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Lot 0060 Details

Description
...
French and Indian War

Important Early 18th Century Frontiersman Morris Griffith Archive: 12 Items and 15 Pages, Dated 1721 - 1753

Morris (Maurice) Griffith (1686 - 1766). Collection of 12 documents signed by or related to Griffith. In fair to good condition with expected weakness at the folds, some holes and paper loss including words, partial splits, wear, toning and foxing, some with chipped edges and smoothed folds.

Background

In The Tales of the Walrus (Xlibris, 2013), Richard Sharkey writes that "George Washington … knew a man of Welsh background named Morris (also sometimes known as Maurice) Griffith who served as an Indian scout at sometime during the French and Indian War."

Griffith was an experienced frontiersmen in the New River and Holston River area of Augusta County in Virginia. A prominent figure among the settlers of the Welsh Tract in Pennsylvania, on August 12, 1755, Morris Griffith was captured in a raid on Vause’s fort and escaped.

On July 10, 1758, in a letter, Christopher Gist informed Major George Washington that Morris Griffith had safely returned after being confronted by a "Party of Indians & French … This Seems to be the foundation of the News we had Sometime past of a Number of white Men and Indians Makeing for Bedford County. I thought proper to give you this …" . In 1750, the Ohio Company had hired Gist to survey along the Ohio River from what is now Pittsburgh to Louisville. Travelling with Washington to the Ohio Country in 1754, Gist served as scout, messenger, and Indian agent."

Gist continued, "There were many such tales of a so-called Welsh tribe; one of interest was a Maurice Griffith who was taken prisoner by the Shawnee Indians in 1764. The Indians eventually befriended him and took him on a hunting expedition to seek the source of the Missouri. High in the mountains they came across 'three white men in Indian dress' with whom they travelled for several days until they arrived at a village where there were others of the same tribe, all having the same European complexion. A council of this white Indian tribe decided to put the strangers to death and Griffith decided it was time to speak. He addressed them in the Welsh language explaining that they had no hostile intentions but merely sought the source of the Missouri and that they would return to their own lands satisfied with their discoveries. The Chief of the Tribe greeted them in Welsh and they were thereafter treated as guests, staying with the nation some eight months. " --- from Professor Bernard Knight CBE, President of MIRA, Madoc International Research Association, a group that meets regularly in South Wales to discuss their common interest in the legend of Prince Madoc ap Owain Gwynedd's voyages into the Western Ocean around 1170 AD and his possible landing in North America.

The Collection

(1) Autograph Letter Signed "your ever loving Aunt Cat. Howell," 1 page, 8.25" x 12". Peny gally [Wales], September 12, 1721. To her nephew, Morris Griffith, who had just arrived from Wales to America. In part, "… she keeps her at school, and bought her a new bible, by which means she is taught to read, which exceeds the riches of men's labor … they made his friends and relations that came to his funeral most heartily welcome, & made the priest preach on their charges; your father has been very diligent in enquiring whither it lies in his power to disinherit you …"

(2) Manuscript Document Signed "Jno Taylor" as Surveyor General of Chester County, 1 page, 7.5" x 8". Willis Town [Chester County, Pennsylvania], July 8, 1729. Taylor certified the description of the land. In part, "Morris Griffith's Land Situate in Willis Town in the County of Chester which he purchased of Michael Jobson. Begins at a black Oak being a Corner of Owen Thomas's Land thence South East … Containing one Hundred and twenty five acres besides the Usual Allowance for roads and highways."

(3) Manuscript Document Signed "Richd Richardson" and by two witnesses, 1 page, 7.5" x 12", on verso of a related signed Manuscript Document Signed, a "bond of arbitration" relating to the deed "Richard Richardson to Moris Griffith," August 30, 1731.

(4) Manuscript Letter Signed "Thomas Williams" in Dutch and Welsh, 1 page, 12" x 14". [Wales], June 22, 1733. To Morris Grifis. With transcription and partial English translation. In part " … give to Thomas James the means to come over to you and to pay fir my passage which I would have as inheritance from you and in that case it is likely that you were angry at that time as I was too young to come over and if you were to promise the same sort of promise now as the pen is in my hand…"

(5) Manuscript Letter Signed "Evan Yarward," 1 page, 8" x 12". July 7, 1736. In part, "I have send you these few lines to acquaint you how my Condition is in having a tennant to your father who is at home with me upon Condition as long as he be left untroubled by those that he is Indebted unto …" Addressed on verso to "Morris Griffith in the / Township of Willestown / Chester County Pensilv / ania."

(6) Third Person Autograph Letter Signed "Lewis James" in Welsh, 1 page, 4.25" x 8". Circa 1750. Not translated; with Welsh typescript. Addressed on verso to "Moris / Griffiths / a Pensilfan / ia." Mentions insurance, a house, and land in Wales.

(7) Autograph Letter Signed "Geo. Ashbridge," 1 page, 7.25" x 6.75". November 15, 1750. To "friend Morris Griffith." In full, "I have made Inquirey Concerning the Land that John Thomas Lives on and find that he is about three years behind of Paying his Rent which is twenty five Bushels of wheat a year he has a Previledg of Buying off the Leas fir one hundred Pound; it now belongs to Samuel Smith of Philadelphia he Lives in water Street above Mulbery Street. I am thy friend."

(8) His Will. Manuscript DS "Morris Griffit[h]," 3 pages, 7.75" x 12.5", front & verso on two conjoined sheets. Willistown, Pennsylvania, February 17, 1751. Portion missing on signature page removed "h" of signature. Signed by three witnesses. Griffith grants his lands and fortunes to his wife, children and relations, some still residing in Carmarthenshire, Wales. He also bequeaths to Jane Messer, his indentured servant, "The sum of Ten Pounds Pennsylvania currency and One Bed & Bedding after the Decease of my Wife ..."

(9) Manuscript Letter Signed "Evan Edward" in Welsh, 1 page, 8.25" x 8.25". March 9, 1752. Mentioning Moris Griffith, Mary Griffith, William Griffith and Thomas Griffith. Not translated.

(10) Autograph Letter Signed "Thomas Grythdd and wife" in Welsh, 1 page, to brother Moris. With partial English translation. [Wales], February 4. In part, "These few lines … find you as I am at this time a professor of God From your dear brother Thomas Gryffyth. He and his wife and three sons are in health and full of love. You have heard that Thomas, your brother, was dead, according to an account we heard, but we are still living in health, mercifully …"

(11) Manuscript Letter Signed "John Ma…," 2 pages, 5.5" x 6.75", separate conjoined sheets. March 15, 1753. Addressed on verso to "Mr Morris Griffiths / East Town / Living in Chester County / In / Pensilvania." In part, "There is one Sarah Grifith married to David John a Tenant of Mine, who have Many Small Children and in no Circumstance of otherwise there a Common Labourer who have desired now to visit to you …"

(12) Manuscript Letter Signed "Mary Jones," 1 page, 7.75" x 12.5", with integral leaf addressed "To / Mr. Morris Griffith / at Willistown in / Chester County in / Pensilvania / with Care These." Haverfird West, March 20, 1753. In part, "having this severall opportunity … to Enquire after your welfare as tis to Long Since I hard from you, you was so kind formerly to Send me a pair of Gloves … the woman which is the Bearer was a Servant with my father the year my mother Dide … "

This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.

WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!

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