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S. Court William H. Moody Re: Ambassador to Japan

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S. Court William H. Moody Re: Ambassador to Japan
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Description
S. Court William H. Moody Re: Ambassador to Japan

Future U.S. Supreme Court Justice William H. Moody Disappoints Correspondent Seeking to be Ambassador to Japan
“the posts in our diplomatic and consular service are now pretty nearly all the political rewards left and they go by the favor that arises out of such conditions.”
In this typed response, Secretary of the Navy William H. Moody tells a correspondent in Japan that he is unlikely to be able to succeed Ambassador Alfred Buck (1832-1902), who died at his post fewer than three months later.
WILLIAM H. MOODY, Typed Letter Signed, to Willard C. Tyler, September 25, 1902, Washington, D.C. 2 pp., 8? x 10.5?. On Navy Department stationery. Expected folds

residue from paper clip

very good.
Excerpts
“I have read with much interest the letter which I received yesterday from you and the enclosed editorial from the Japanese paper. Evidently you practice upon these heathen the arts of the politician.”
“With relation to the question of the succession to Mr. Buck I will speak frankly. If positions of this kind were distributed according to the real needs of the service, and solely for that reason, you certainly would be better adapted for duty than any one who would be likely to be selected. But the posts in our diplomatic and consular service are now pretty nearly all the political rewards left and they go by the favor that arises out of such conditions.”
“I am by no means certain of my adaptation or adaptability to this position and am holding the question in suspense in my own mind, satisfied that up to the present point I am not a demonstrated failure. The work is not easy and presents a good many perplexities, which is but another way of saying that it is work.”
William H. Moody (1853-1917) was born in Massachusetts and graduated from Harvard University in 1876. He attended Harvard Law School for a few months and gained admission to the Massachusetts bar in 1878. As the District Attorney for Eastern Massachusetts, he gained widespread notoriety as the junior prosecutor in the Lizzie Borden murder case. Moody won election to the U.S. House of Representatives and served there from 1895 to 1902. President Theodore Roosevelt appointed Moody as Secretary of the Navy, a position he held from May 1902 to June 1904. He then served as U.S. Attorney General from 1904 to 1906. In December 1906, Roosevelt nominated Moody as an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, and the Senate confirmed him, and he took his seat later that month. He served until November 1910, when he retired due to ill health. During his brief tenure, he authored 67 opinions and 5 dissents.
Willard C. Tyler (1856-1936) was born in Massachusetts and gained knowledge of the railroad industry during five years with the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad. From 1898 to 1902, Tyler served as the representative of the American Locomotive Company in Japan. In one early trip, he sold one hundred locomotives to Japanese companies. He apparently spoke Japanese fluently. In 1904, Tyler took charge of the Eastern Business Department of the American Engineer and Railroad Journal, published monthly in New York.
From the famous Supreme Court collection of Scott Petersen.
This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.
WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE.
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S. Court William H. Moody Re: Ambassador to Japan

Estimate $300 - $400
Aug 19, 2020
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Starting Price $100
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0245: S. Court William H. Moody Re: Ambassador to Japan

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Est. $300 - $400Starting Price $100
Rare Autographs, Manuscripts & Books
Aug 19, 2020 10:30 AM EDT
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Lot 0245 Details

Description
...
S. Court William H. Moody Re: Ambassador to Japan

Future U.S. Supreme Court Justice William H. Moody Disappoints Correspondent Seeking to be Ambassador to Japan
“the posts in our diplomatic and consular service are now pretty nearly all the political rewards left and they go by the favor that arises out of such conditions.”
In this typed response, Secretary of the Navy William H. Moody tells a correspondent in Japan that he is unlikely to be able to succeed Ambassador Alfred Buck (1832-1902), who died at his post fewer than three months later.
WILLIAM H. MOODY, Typed Letter Signed, to Willard C. Tyler, September 25, 1902, Washington, D.C. 2 pp., 8? x 10.5?. On Navy Department stationery. Expected folds

residue from paper clip

very good.
Excerpts
“I have read with much interest the letter which I received yesterday from you and the enclosed editorial from the Japanese paper. Evidently you practice upon these heathen the arts of the politician.”
“With relation to the question of the succession to Mr. Buck I will speak frankly. If positions of this kind were distributed according to the real needs of the service, and solely for that reason, you certainly would be better adapted for duty than any one who would be likely to be selected. But the posts in our diplomatic and consular service are now pretty nearly all the political rewards left and they go by the favor that arises out of such conditions.”
“I am by no means certain of my adaptation or adaptability to this position and am holding the question in suspense in my own mind, satisfied that up to the present point I am not a demonstrated failure. The work is not easy and presents a good many perplexities, which is but another way of saying that it is work.”
William H. Moody (1853-1917) was born in Massachusetts and graduated from Harvard University in 1876. He attended Harvard Law School for a few months and gained admission to the Massachusetts bar in 1878. As the District Attorney for Eastern Massachusetts, he gained widespread notoriety as the junior prosecutor in the Lizzie Borden murder case. Moody won election to the U.S. House of Representatives and served there from 1895 to 1902. President Theodore Roosevelt appointed Moody as Secretary of the Navy, a position he held from May 1902 to June 1904. He then served as U.S. Attorney General from 1904 to 1906. In December 1906, Roosevelt nominated Moody as an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, and the Senate confirmed him, and he took his seat later that month. He served until November 1910, when he retired due to ill health. During his brief tenure, he authored 67 opinions and 5 dissents.
Willard C. Tyler (1856-1936) was born in Massachusetts and gained knowledge of the railroad industry during five years with the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad. From 1898 to 1902, Tyler served as the representative of the American Locomotive Company in Japan. In one early trip, he sold one hundred locomotives to Japanese companies. He apparently spoke Japanese fluently. In 1904, Tyler took charge of the Eastern Business Department of the American Engineer and Railroad Journal, published monthly in New York.
From the famous Supreme Court collection of Scott Petersen.
This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.
WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE.

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