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George Pickett Pays for his Sword and First Officer's

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George Pickett Pays for his Sword and First Officer's
Item Details
Description

George Pickett Pays for his Sword and First Officer's Uniform, Purchased at the Outbreak of the Mexican War

Autograph endorsement signed, "Receipt in full from Earl Jr & Co pr Attorney GE Pickett," accomplished on the docket of a manuscript document signed, "Charles D. Solding[?] Agent for Earle & Co.," 1 page, 7.25" x 10," Washington, November 14, 1850, being an account documenting clothing purchases by Pickett from clothiers John Earle Jr. & Co. of Boston between May 1844 and August 1846. Light soiling along mailing creases on verso, else fine condition.

An historic document chronicling Pickett's clothing purchases, mostly made at the time of his graduation from West Point in June 1846. His purchases included (on May 30, 1846): "1 Bl[ac]k dress coat 25 - 1 Unif[orm] frock 25... 1 tweed sock 8 - 1 p[ai]r bl[ac]k p[an]ts 9.50 ... 1 pr fancy doe[?] pts 8.50 - 1 fancy vest 5... 1 Blk satin vest 5 - 6 shirts 15... 3 prs white dl. pts. 13.50 6 Byron Collars 2 ... 6 camb[rick] h[an]d k[erchi]fs - 1 Sock[?] 8-." On June 4, Pickett ordered "1 pr silk gloves 1 1 pr suspenders 1.25..." After his graduation, Pickett traveled to Richmond, Virginia on furlough awaiting orders which did not arrive until late July 1846, when he was assigned to the 8th Infantry, then in Matamoras, Mexico. On August 21, 1846, Pickett ordered the final touches to his first uniform as a commissioned officer in the United States Army: "1 und. frock 25- Sword 18, Sash 18."

Pickett reported to his regiment on November 9, 1846, two months later than scheduled, and much to the annoyance of his commanding officer, Colonel J.D. Clark. Although in his explanation Pickett blamed a series of travel mishaps--such as low water levels and other obstacles--part of the explanation may have been that he was still awaiting the delivery of his sword which he had only ordered in late August. 

It appears by the account that the sword did not arrive right away, as he was credited on the account for several articles including "1 sword - not sent." In addition to his graduation purchases, Pickett had obtained clothing from the same Boston clothiers in May of 1844, which included "1 Uniform frock." As to his payment, it was less punctual than his ability to report to duty on time. At the start of the Mexican War, Pickett's balance with the Boston clothier was over $200, an amount he did not entirely satisfy until November 14, 1850!

The United States had declared war on Mexico just before Pickett's graduation, and the army was in great need of fresh officers to fill out the ranks. Despite his tardiness in reporting for duty, Pickett gained early fame by carrying the colors over the parapet during the Battle of Chapultepec—a flag handed to him by his comrade, Lt. James Longstreet, who had been wounded at the base of the wall.

This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.

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George Pickett Pays for his Sword and First Officer's

Estimate $3,000 - $3,500
Nov 11, 2020
See Sold Price
Starting Price $1,000
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Ships from Westport, CT, United States
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0209: George Pickett Pays for his Sword and First Officer's

Sold for $1,800
9 Bids
Est. $3,000 - $3,500Starting Price $1,000
Rare Autographs, Manuscripts & Books
Nov 11, 2020 10:30 AM EST
Buyer's Premium 25%

Lot 0209 Details

Description
...

George Pickett Pays for his Sword and First Officer's Uniform, Purchased at the Outbreak of the Mexican War

Autograph endorsement signed, "Receipt in full from Earl Jr & Co pr Attorney GE Pickett," accomplished on the docket of a manuscript document signed, "Charles D. Solding[?] Agent for Earle & Co.," 1 page, 7.25" x 10," Washington, November 14, 1850, being an account documenting clothing purchases by Pickett from clothiers John Earle Jr. & Co. of Boston between May 1844 and August 1846. Light soiling along mailing creases on verso, else fine condition.

An historic document chronicling Pickett's clothing purchases, mostly made at the time of his graduation from West Point in June 1846. His purchases included (on May 30, 1846): "1 Bl[ac]k dress coat 25 - 1 Unif[orm] frock 25... 1 tweed sock 8 - 1 p[ai]r bl[ac]k p[an]ts 9.50 ... 1 pr fancy doe[?] pts 8.50 - 1 fancy vest 5... 1 Blk satin vest 5 - 6 shirts 15... 3 prs white dl. pts. 13.50 6 Byron Collars 2 ... 6 camb[rick] h[an]d k[erchi]fs - 1 Sock[?] 8-." On June 4, Pickett ordered "1 pr silk gloves 1 1 pr suspenders 1.25..." After his graduation, Pickett traveled to Richmond, Virginia on furlough awaiting orders which did not arrive until late July 1846, when he was assigned to the 8th Infantry, then in Matamoras, Mexico. On August 21, 1846, Pickett ordered the final touches to his first uniform as a commissioned officer in the United States Army: "1 und. frock 25- Sword 18, Sash 18."

Pickett reported to his regiment on November 9, 1846, two months later than scheduled, and much to the annoyance of his commanding officer, Colonel J.D. Clark. Although in his explanation Pickett blamed a series of travel mishaps--such as low water levels and other obstacles--part of the explanation may have been that he was still awaiting the delivery of his sword which he had only ordered in late August. 

It appears by the account that the sword did not arrive right away, as he was credited on the account for several articles including "1 sword - not sent." In addition to his graduation purchases, Pickett had obtained clothing from the same Boston clothiers in May of 1844, which included "1 Uniform frock." As to his payment, it was less punctual than his ability to report to duty on time. At the start of the Mexican War, Pickett's balance with the Boston clothier was over $200, an amount he did not entirely satisfy until November 14, 1850!

The United States had declared war on Mexico just before Pickett's graduation, and the army was in great need of fresh officers to fill out the ranks. Despite his tardiness in reporting for duty, Pickett gained early fame by carrying the colors over the parapet during the Battle of Chapultepec—a flag handed to him by his comrade, Lt. James Longstreet, who had been wounded at the base of the wall.

This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.

WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!

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