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George Townshend, Archive of 5 ALS, Rev War & 18th

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George Townshend, Archive of 5 ALS, Rev War & 18th
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George Townshend, Archive of 5 ALS, Rev War & 18th Century Aristocracy Content

Townshend, George--Field Marshal, 1st Marquess Townshend--Five Letters. (1724-1807) British general who assumed command on the Plains of Abraham after General Wolfe's death. As a result of General Wolfe's death and General Monckton's being wounded, he received the capitulation of the French at Quebec. Five letters (14  pages) signed between 1748 and 1796, plus two letters from his father, the 3rd Viscount Townshend. Concerning a variety of affairs, touching on the Revolutionary War, social, familial, political, and military affairs. The letters offer a revealing look into the lives of the 18th century aristocracy, with references to, horses, debts, illnesses, recruiting of soldiers, dog breeding, service, vacationing, and rent collections. There are also references to Charles Townshend, brother of George, who as Chancellor of the Exchequer proposed the Townshend Acts, the unpopular revenue laws that helped precipitate the American Revolution. Toning and soiling; a few biographical notes in pencil in a later hand. Overall very good. Goodspeed's Book Shop, Inc. Goodspeed's Book Shop opened in 1898 at Beacon and Somerset streets in Boston, Massachusetts, the shop quickly became well known for its carefully curated selection of books, prints, autographs, and maps.

George Townshend, a high-ranking soldier and politician, and Charles Townshend, a key member of Britain's Board of Trade, took on important roles in the British empire in the years just before the Revolution. George, a year older than his sibling, worked to create an empire of imperial might. Below are just a few partial quotes shown within the archive:

Letter dated September 30, 1763 in which he discusses training Portugal in Military Science..:

Townshend discusses Portugal "in which a young man, one of them I believe is known to your Lordship, Capt. Ferrier - desired me to obtain your Lordships permission for him to remain some time longer in that Country, being employed at present by ye Count de la Lippe in establishing an Military Academy, to ground, if possible, the Portuguese officers in some Degree of Military Science..."

Letter dated July 26,1778 in which George mentions his brother, Charles and the 'standing by' of the British Troops:

"...I had lately pleasure of hearing from my brother Charles who I find is going again to Scarborough for his health. I hope this will be ye last time he will require ye help of those waters. Our Army is here in ye most perfect State of Inaction. The Beauty, Address, Discipline + Spirit of our Troops is really a most melancholy object when such a unsuccessful and are so unfortunate as to be obliged give up such a Cause. Ye other day we used to in by ruminate ye Enemy's irresistible Superiority, and now ye greatest Part in by ruminate ye reduction ye Nation will soon be obliged to make, and in one day discharge a number of men from her Service that no other Nation in Europe would be glad to engage + entertain in a time of ye most settled Tranquility..."

Just a few months prior, on February 6, 1778, France and America concluded an alliance by signing two treaties, a treaty of amity and commerce and a military alliance. The nations exchanged ambassadors, and France and England were soon at war. Recognizing that the French alliance with the Americans might cause serious difficulties for the British, Parliament soon passed bills calling for reconciliation with America. They sent a peace commission to Philadelphia to attempt to find a settlement. As before, it was too little, too late; when the Americans adopted the Declaration of Independence, they had crossed the Rubicon; there was no turning back. The Americans refused to accept the commission and declared that any person who met with the commission would be branded an enemy of the United States. Congress responded that the only basis for reconciliation would be a full withdrawal of all British troops from American soil and recognition of American independence, conditions which parliament could not accept. The war would continue. In May Sir Henry Clinton replaced General Howe and, hearing that a French fleet was en route to America, decided to move his army back to New York. The Americans reoccupied Philadelphia on June 18, and Washington decided to pursue the retreating British across New Jersey. On June 28 Washington caught up with the British at Monmouth Courthouse, New Jersey. General Charles Lee was in command of an advance unit with orders to attack at the first opportunity. Orders to Generals Lafayette and Anthony Wayne became confused, and Lee precipitously ordered a retreat, which brought on a counterattack by Clinton. Washington soon arrived on the scene and, furious at Lee’s order for retreat, is said to have sworn so forcefully that the leaves shook on the trees. Washington rallied his men, and with the discipline instilled by the training of Baron von Steuben, the Americans met the British squarely. Although the outcome was indecisive, it was clear that the Americans had fought the British to a standstill. Clinton withdrew and took his army back into New York, and Washington moved north of the city and settled into camp near White Plains, about twenty miles north of Manhattan. The war in the North thus remained a stalemate—with Clinton boxed in in New York, and Washington holding the Hudson River line.

This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.

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George Townshend, Archive of 5 ALS, Rev War & 18th

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0216: George Townshend, Archive of 5 ALS, Rev War & 18th

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George Townshend, Archive of 5 ALS, Rev War & 18th Century Aristocracy Content

Townshend, George--Field Marshal, 1st Marquess Townshend--Five Letters. (1724-1807) British general who assumed command on the Plains of Abraham after General Wolfe's death. As a result of General Wolfe's death and General Monckton's being wounded, he received the capitulation of the French at Quebec. Five letters (14  pages) signed between 1748 and 1796, plus two letters from his father, the 3rd Viscount Townshend. Concerning a variety of affairs, touching on the Revolutionary War, social, familial, political, and military affairs. The letters offer a revealing look into the lives of the 18th century aristocracy, with references to, horses, debts, illnesses, recruiting of soldiers, dog breeding, service, vacationing, and rent collections. There are also references to Charles Townshend, brother of George, who as Chancellor of the Exchequer proposed the Townshend Acts, the unpopular revenue laws that helped precipitate the American Revolution. Toning and soiling; a few biographical notes in pencil in a later hand. Overall very good. Goodspeed's Book Shop, Inc. Goodspeed's Book Shop opened in 1898 at Beacon and Somerset streets in Boston, Massachusetts, the shop quickly became well known for its carefully curated selection of books, prints, autographs, and maps.

George Townshend, a high-ranking soldier and politician, and Charles Townshend, a key member of Britain's Board of Trade, took on important roles in the British empire in the years just before the Revolution. George, a year older than his sibling, worked to create an empire of imperial might. Below are just a few partial quotes shown within the archive:

Letter dated September 30, 1763 in which he discusses training Portugal in Military Science..:

Townshend discusses Portugal "in which a young man, one of them I believe is known to your Lordship, Capt. Ferrier - desired me to obtain your Lordships permission for him to remain some time longer in that Country, being employed at present by ye Count de la Lippe in establishing an Military Academy, to ground, if possible, the Portuguese officers in some Degree of Military Science..."

Letter dated July 26,1778 in which George mentions his brother, Charles and the 'standing by' of the British Troops:

"...I had lately pleasure of hearing from my brother Charles who I find is going again to Scarborough for his health. I hope this will be ye last time he will require ye help of those waters. Our Army is here in ye most perfect State of Inaction. The Beauty, Address, Discipline + Spirit of our Troops is really a most melancholy object when such a unsuccessful and are so unfortunate as to be obliged give up such a Cause. Ye other day we used to in by ruminate ye Enemy's irresistible Superiority, and now ye greatest Part in by ruminate ye reduction ye Nation will soon be obliged to make, and in one day discharge a number of men from her Service that no other Nation in Europe would be glad to engage + entertain in a time of ye most settled Tranquility..."

Just a few months prior, on February 6, 1778, France and America concluded an alliance by signing two treaties, a treaty of amity and commerce and a military alliance. The nations exchanged ambassadors, and France and England were soon at war. Recognizing that the French alliance with the Americans might cause serious difficulties for the British, Parliament soon passed bills calling for reconciliation with America. They sent a peace commission to Philadelphia to attempt to find a settlement. As before, it was too little, too late; when the Americans adopted the Declaration of Independence, they had crossed the Rubicon; there was no turning back. The Americans refused to accept the commission and declared that any person who met with the commission would be branded an enemy of the United States. Congress responded that the only basis for reconciliation would be a full withdrawal of all British troops from American soil and recognition of American independence, conditions which parliament could not accept. The war would continue. In May Sir Henry Clinton replaced General Howe and, hearing that a French fleet was en route to America, decided to move his army back to New York. The Americans reoccupied Philadelphia on June 18, and Washington decided to pursue the retreating British across New Jersey. On June 28 Washington caught up with the British at Monmouth Courthouse, New Jersey. General Charles Lee was in command of an advance unit with orders to attack at the first opportunity. Orders to Generals Lafayette and Anthony Wayne became confused, and Lee precipitously ordered a retreat, which brought on a counterattack by Clinton. Washington soon arrived on the scene and, furious at Lee’s order for retreat, is said to have sworn so forcefully that the leaves shook on the trees. Washington rallied his men, and with the discipline instilled by the training of Baron von Steuben, the Americans met the British squarely. Although the outcome was indecisive, it was clear that the Americans had fought the British to a standstill. Clinton withdrew and took his army back into New York, and Washington moved north of the city and settled into camp near White Plains, about twenty miles north of Manhattan. The war in the North thus remained a stalemate—with Clinton boxed in in New York, and Washington holding the Hudson River line.

This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.

WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!

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